Would asylum for Edward Snowden serve the public interest?

Edward Snowden
With help from a WikiLeaks lawyer, the young American who admits he leaked information about National Security Agency surveillance programs has now asked more than 20 nations to give him asylum.

But as NPR’s Jean Cochran said early Tuesday on the network’s newscast, Edward Snowden’s chances of getting asylum from any nation in Europe “do not look promising. … Poland has turned him down. Officials in Germany, Norway, Austria and Switzerland say he cannot apply from abroad.”

There was also word from India’s foreign minister early Tuesday that India won’t accept Snowden’s request.

Meanwhile, Reuters reports that Snowden sent a letter in Spanish to Eucador:

Snowden said the United States was illegally persecuting him for revealing its electronic surveillance program, PRISM. He also thanked Ecuador for helping him get to Russia and for examining his asylum request.

“I remain free and able to publish information that serves the public interest,” Snowden said in an undated Spanish-language letter sent to President Rafael Correa of Ecuador, seen by Reuters.

“No matter how many more days my life contains, I remain dedicated to the fight for justice in this unequal world. If any of those days ahead realize a contribution to the common good, the world will have the principles of Ecuador to thank,” part of the text read, according to a translation.

Today’s Question: Would asylum for Edward Snowden serve the public interest?