Chatfield students win Rube Goldberg competition again

The kids in Chatfield, Minn. (pop. 2,783), southeast of Rochester, are a physics dynasty in the making.

The team at Chatfield High School has captured first place in the Rube Goldberg competition in Indiana in Division II (high school ages).

It’s the second straight victory for the squad, which had to battle snow days to get their entry completed in time for the regional competition in Wisconsin earlier this month, the Rochester Post-Bulletin says.

The schools were given a single challenge and left to come up with something that would creatively accomplish the task. This year’s challenge: put money in a piggybank.

Here’s the winner. The Physics Pharm:

After the team won the regional competition, it put about 20 more steps into the project, which involved hundreds of hours and some nights at school.

“I knew we had a good machine,” said Gage Tuohy, a Chatfield senior and member of last year’s team.

The kids who’ll return next year say they’re already working on planning the entry for next year’s three-peat: turning off a light.

  • That’s pretty cool.

  • Al

    Our daughter is obsessed with Rube Goldberg machines. I love that there is an entire contest for this. I weep for the future state of our living room, but ¯_(ツ)_/¯

    • Jack Ungerleider

      It appears you can get her started with the classic board game Mouse Trap. Now available from Hasbro (they bought Milton Bradley who probably bought the rights from someone else) and Amazon.
      https://www.amazon.com/Mouse-Trap-Game-Amazon-Exclusive/dp/B00000DMFD

      • Al

        We still have my Mousetrap game from when I was a kid; she loves it. 😀

  • Consider a task like next year’s challenge, turning off a light. The irony is that as Byzantine a series of events the automation of this simple task might generate, that series will be dwarfed by what goes on behind the scenes when you say, “Alexa, turn off the light.” It’s as complex a series of steps as any Goldbergian contraption, but the workings are invisible to us, hidden by the “black box” of technology.

  • Jack Ungerleider

    Let’s hear it for Shaun the Sheep!