What’s on MPR News – 2/21/19

Thursday February 21, 2019
(Subject to change as events dictate. This page is updated throughout the day.)

9 a.m. – MPR News with Kerri Miller
The awards show won’t have a host this year and has changed its planned broadcast — and then changed that plan again. Do the Oscars generate more drama than the movies they celebrate?

Guests: Gil L. Robertson IV, co-founder and president of the African American Film Critics Association; Aisha Harris, senior culture editor at the New York Times.

10 a.m.- 1A with Joshua Johnson
After decades of revelations about abuse by clergy in the Catholic Church, this week, bishops will come to Rome to discuss the protection of children.

This meeting, hosted by Pope Francis, is the first of its kind. And while some of the faithful applaud the church’s effort to address the issue, some are suggesting the institution is simply too damaged to remain credible.

Guests: John Allen, editor, Crux; president, Crux Catholic Media Inc.; Karen Tumulty, national political reporter, The Washington Post; Sister Simone Campbell, executive director, Network Lobby for Catholic Social Justice.

11 a.m. – MPR News with Angela Davis
Anoka native Gretchen Carlson became one of the faces of the #metoo movement when the TV anchor sued FOX News CEO Roger Ailes for harassment. The former Miss America got a large financial settlement, an apology and a new mission.

Guest: Gretchen Carlson

11:45 a.m. – Every day during Black History Month, MPR News is profiling one black Minnesotan who is making history right now. These Minnesotans are financial gurus, civic leaders, people inspiring the next generation. We’re asking each of them about the figures who have shaped them and their vision for African-Americans in the state.

At the end of Thursday’s show, we’ll feature highlights from three of these “ChangeMakers”: St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter, Me’Lea Connelly of Village Financial Cooperative, and Leslie Redmond, president of the Minneapolis branch of the NAACP.

12 p.m. – MPR News Presents
The conclusion of the three-part APM Reports documentary series: “Order 9066.” President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, ordering the relocation and incarceration of Japanese-Americans.

1 p.m. – The Takeaway
A conversation about the libel laws in America, on the heels of Supreme Court Justice Thomas’ calls for reconsidering the landmark SCOTUS case New York Times v. Sullivan from 1964, which said that a public official would have to prove “actual malice” in order to win a libel case against a media outlet.

This week, President Trump warned Venezuelan military leaders staying loyal to President Nicolas Maduro to stop blocking humanitarian aid at the border, implying possible U.S. military intervention if the warning was not heeded.

Empire actor Jussie Smollett has been charged with staging his own assault, and faces a felony charge of disorderly conduct in Chicago. He could be facing several years in prison.

The 91st Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, February 24th, but in the run up to this year’s ceremony, the focus has been less on the nominees, and more on numerous missteps made by the Academy.

2 p.m. – BBC NewsHour
As Pope Francis hosts a summit at the Vatican to tackle sexual abuse within the Catholic Church, a BBC investigation in India reveals claims that the Archbishop of Mumbai failed to respond adequately to allegations brought to him by victims. And a report on the rise of anti-semitism in France.

3 p.m. – All Things Considered
The Vatican clergy abuse summit; the people who hope for a US invasion of Venezuela; the surge in teacher strikes; the annual Hollywood diversity report.

6:00 p.m. – Marketplace
Law school enrollment has plummeted since the recession, and several law schools have closed their doors for good. Marketplace looks at what’s taking the bottom out from the business of legal education.

6:30 p.m. – The Daily
Supporters promised an economic transformation that would benefit generations. Opponents feared a billion-dollar giveaway to the world’s most profitable company. Here’s how the deal to bring Amazon to New York City fell apart.

Guest: J. David Goodman, who covers New York politics for The Times.

7 p.m. – The World
A Saudi vacation. TV ads show Saudi Arabia to be a land of beauty and mystery. It’s all about attracting tourists, and helping the Saudi kingdom rely less on oil revenues. But the Saudi human rights record has gotten in the way.

8 p.m. – Fresh Air
Jeffrey Toobin is the senior legal analyst for CNN and a staff writer for The New Yorker. He writes about Roger Stone who has been indicted in the Mueller investigation, and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi – two men Toobin says have influenced Trump’s world view. His article (Roger Stone’s and Jerome Corsi’s Time in the Barrell) in the current issue of The New Yorker.

  • MrE85

    “TV ads show Saudi Arabia to be a land of beauty and mystery.”

    The only mystery is why anyone in their right mind would go there. The world has other hot, sandy places to look at.

    • jon

      The land is likely filled with beauty and mystery.

      The issue is the repressive government.
      But governments come and go…

      It’s not on my list of vacation destinations now, but if a government change takes place, it might get added to my list after a few years of stability.

      • MrE85

        Suggested headline: “Saudi Arabia, a Mecca for tourism?”