MN High School League blocks shot clock for basketball

It’s apparently going to take a lot more to get a shot clock in Minnesota high school basketball.

On Monday, the Minnesota State High School League rejected — again — calls for a shot clock, calls which were amplified this year by the game between Marshall and Waseca in Minnesota’s Section 2AAA tournament. It was a lot of stand around and watch ball.

WDAY says the MSHSL cited the cost of installing the shot clock, in which players have a limited amount of time to control the ball without taking a shot.

Coaches want the shot clock, the Star Tribune says, but the activities directors at schools around the state do not.

The vote was 128-to-24 by the MSHSL, which was closer than a lot of the games in high school basketball in Minnesota last season.

According to the MSHSL minutes, three coaches spoke in favor of the shot clock; nobody spoke against it.

Tom Critchley, executive director of the boys’ basketball coaches association, has been making the proposal for a decade. The told the Strib he’s disappointed, but there are signs of progress.

“The strategy of holding onto the ball for two minutes with a five, six point lead just isn’t good basketball. That’s not the way we teach kids how to play,” Willmar boys basketball head coach Matt Williams told the West Central Tribune after February’s Waseca-Marshall game.

His gym is set up to use a shot clock, and the school does use it for non-conference games.

And even some coaches who favor the shot clock are concerned about what it might do to the sport, particular for girl’s basketball in which outside shooting is often hard to find. A shot clock might encourage defenders to pack the area under the basketball, daring players to shoot bricks.

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  • >>“The strategy of holding onto the ball for two minutes with a five, six point lead just isn’t good basketball. That’s not the way we teach kids how to play,” <<

    Apparently it IS how some teams are taught to play.

    Don't like the other team holding on to the ball for extended periods of time? Pressure or foul that player. Problem solved.

    • That doesn’t make sense. Then YOUR players are in foul trouble and you’re giving them an open shot closer to the basket.

  • BJ

    Create a rule of ‘delay of game’ or something similar that isn’t tied to a shot clock, referee can decide if they are just holding the ball for a time that is greater than normal play. turn over given if that’s the case.

    MSHSL doesn’t need to install shot clocks, referees make judgement calls all game long this will just be another.

  • Rob

    I would think most schools could afford shot clocks; all they have to do is cut their foreign language, music and arts classes.

  • Jeff

    Wisconsin has them, so maybe play there. Apparently there are very few states (9?) that have shot clocks. This is a national issue as well with the same arguments for and against. I say we have a Constitutional referendum. https://www.athleticbusiness.com/high-school/time-to-implement-a-shot-clock-in-high-school-basketball.html

    • They can be used in non conference games here.

  • Joseph

    >>>And even some coaches who favor the shot clock are concerned about what it might do to the sport, particular for girl’s basketball in which outside shooting is often hard to find. A shot clock might encourage defenders to pack the area under the basketball, daring players to shoot bricks.<<<

    So is this saying that girls basketball players can't make 3-pointers? 0.0

    • Yeah (See WCT article). There’s not enough girl’s with outside games.

      • Joseph

        That just seems super sexiest to me — basically saying only boy’s can make 3 point shots…

        • I don’t think he’s saying that. But there is a difference between the girls game and the boys game. Not better or worse. Different. The girls game is a more inside game than the boys game is.

  • lindblomeagles

    I side with the MSHSL this time. First, in an era where politicians (Republicans) believe local communities should raise funds for the things they want instead of asking state government to fund educational programs, the shot clock WOULD be an expense some schools just can’t afford. We all know this, and shouldn’t act like we don’t. I believe it was Governor Dayton who JUST vetoed a bonding bill because one of the things the bill lacked was more money for schools. So please, let’s not pretend money isn’t a concern here. And if Tim Pawlenty is elected Governor, you CAN FORGET about money for shot clocks. He was the same clown that cut school budgets before Dayton was elected. I don’t see him turning over a new leaf if he is elected this fall. Second, where the competitive balance is enormous, the school that can score in 30 seconds or less is going to crush the schools that can’t by 30 or 40 points. High school basketball IS NOT pro basketball. Heck, it isn’t even college basketball. Kids are still growing! Some faster than others. Let’s keep games competitive. We don’t need to push our children towards stardom. They can get there within the system we have through hard work and a love of the game.