What’s on MPR News today? 11/28/17

MPR Newsroom. The editors’ area.
Tuesday November 28, 2017

9 a.m. – MPR News with Kerri Miller
Why we sleep. Dr. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley neuroscientist and author of “Why We Sleep,” joins MPR News host Kerri Miller to discuss his book and the latest in sleep science. Plus, Dr. Yo-El Ju, a neurologist and sleep researcher at Washington University in St. Louis, shares what scientists are discovering about the link between poor sleep and dementia.

10 a.m.- 1A with Joshua Johnson
Should classrooms be cellphone free? Prying a smartphone out of a teenager’s hands can be nearly impossible, even in school. For many teachers, this tech addiction is a constant fight. And often, it’s the parents who make it harder to keep order.

Guests: Diana Smith, principal, Washington Latin Public Charter School in Washington D.C.; Lydia Moore, ninth-grade student, Washington Latin Public Charter School in Washington, D.C.; Matt Miles, AP government high school teacher, Chantilly Highschool, Fairfax, Virginia. He is co-author, “Screen Schooled: Two Veteran Teachers Expose How Technology Overuse Is Making Our Kids Dumber“; Dr. David Greenfield, founder, The Center for Internet and Technology Addiction, and assistant clinical professor of psychiatry, University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

11 a.m. – MPR News with Tom Weber
Minnesota’s opioid crisis continues to grow – and with it, the number of babies born to mothers who are addicted to the drugs their mothers abused during pregnancy. MPR’s Tom Weber talks with three guests about what happens when babies are born addicted and what can be done to help.

Guests: Jean Donnell, a family and children services case manager at Red Lake; Kami Kelm, First Step to Healthy Babies case manager and social worker with Beltrami County Health & Human Services; Alyssa Bruning, registered nurse at the Sanford Health in Bemidji.

11:20 a.m. -Minnesota farmers and rural residents who need financial guidance or emotional support again have a place to go: The Farm and Rural Helpline. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture launched the service this fall, replacing an earlier farm crisis line.

Guest: Meg Moynihan, Minnesota Department of Agriculture staff person helping coordinate this helpline effort.

12 p.m. – MPR News Presents
Live from Westminster Town Hall: James Forman, Jr. speaking on “Crime and Punishment in Black America.” He’s a Yale law professor and author of “Locking Up Our Own.”

1 p.m. – The Takeaway
Chaos in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; The future of the Democratic Party; and a look at sexual consent laws.

2 p.m. – BBC NewsHour
Pope Francis met with the de facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi.

3 p.m. – All Things Considered
In cities and towns across the country, citizens are protesting refugees being resettled in their neighborhoods. The story of what that backlash meant for one community in New York’s Hudson Valley.

7 p.m. – The World
Sometimes we like to leave geopolitics behind and focus on what really matters: stockfish. In Nigeria, this type of dried cod is a staple of the country’s famous soups and stews. But you’ll never guess where it comes from, or how it came to be a main ingredient in Nigerian cooking. The BBC’s Victoria Uwonkunda has the answers for us.

Plus, reporter Sally Herships has the story of Jamaica’s push to legalize marijuana. The Jamaican government had actually spent years, and billions of dollars, trying to crack down on growers. But now, they’ve decided to go a different way: to allow farmers to legally grow cannabis for certain purposes.

And sure, we’ll have stories on Donald Trump’s hotel in Panama, and we’ll talk to writer Peter Pomerantsev about why Russia’s fake news machine works so well in the US, but not so well in Germany or Britain.

8 p.m. – Fresh Air
A talk with Dr. Henry Przbylo, who specializes in pediatric anesthesiology, and has written a memoir. Also: Jesmyn Ward, who just won a National Book award for her novel Sing Unburied Sing about a boy with a black mother and a white father, growing up in contemporary rural Mississippi.