‘Who’s your daddy?” taunt idea costs coach his job

Fired Maine high school football coach Duane Greaton says he wants to tell his side of the story and we’re all ears, waiting to find out why the defensive unit of the Gray-New Gloucester football team was told to yell “who’s your daddy?” every time they got to the quarterback for Yarmouth High School.

The quarterback has two mothers.

Greaton, however, has passed on interview requests after the allegations against him were reported in a local newspaper.

There are some good kids on the Gray-New Gloucester team. That’s why they told school officials about Greaton’s idea, the Bangor Daily News reports.

Moments before the game started, the referees were alerted to the idea and told to listen for any taunts. They heard none, the paper says.

In a letter to the school district’s superintendent Lynn and Stephanie Eckersley-Ray said Greaton’s idea was “incredibly discriminatory and hate-laden in nature.”

The superintendent apparently agreed and Greaton is no longer a football coach for the district.

  • >>Fired Maine high school football coach Duane Greaton says he wants to tell his side of the story…<<

    What can I say? I’m a complete and utter failure as a human being
    – Duane Greaton (former football coach)

  • Mike Worcester

    Some day, hopefully in my lifetime, men’s athletics will cease being such a bastion of sexism and juvenile behaviour. Though it does hearten me a bit when I think that would the coach’s dismissal even have happened if this event occurred ten years ago?

    • Dan

      “Several Gray-New Gloucester players told a school official about the coach’s idea before the game, the referees were alerted to listen for the taunts and none were reported during the game itself, WMTW reported.

      Gray-New Gloucester’s top school official told WMTW television a high school football coach is no longer employed by the district”

      I can guarantee this is not how it would have gone when I was in High School. Give the young male athletes (and society) a little credit here.

      • Mike Worcester

        I am certainly giving them credit. Make no mistake about it.

  • MrE85

    “There are some good kids on the Gray-New Gloucester team”

    Maybe more that a few good kids. As no taunts were heard, and the refs were listening, it sounds like the entire team just refused to go along with this awful idea. Once again, an example that the kids will be alright, once the adults leave them alone.

    • …or they never got near the QB.

      /I’ll go with YOUR answer.

    • Mike Worcester

      //Once again, an example that the kids will be alright, once the adults leave them alone.

      You’d think us adults would learn some day. Will we?

      • In the Age of Trump, sadly, bullying by adults has become normalized. 🙁

  • fromthesidelines21

    Coach instructed taunting should be an automatic fire regardless of the “reason” for the taunting. At least at the youth level the expectations for proper sportsmanship should high for coaches.

  • crystals

    I love seeing a positive example of good behavior on the field & off – kudos to the kids & their families. They deserve positive recognition and the now-former coach deserves the boot he got.

    To be the Debbie Downer for a second, though: I’ve sat through enough high school sporting events in the last two years (here in MN) to still be incredibly disheartened overall. We have massive problems related to racial slurs and crowd behavior, and from what I’ve seen, it’s going unaddressed despite the stated policies of the MSHSL. Kids deserve better.

  • chlost

    He was fired.
    As well he should.

  • Erik Petersen

    Football is a bad game