When Minnesota Lynx stepped up, Mpls. cops walked away

Updated 2:05 p.m

When the Minnesota Lynx put on warm-up T-shirts memorializing two black men killed by police, the Dallas police officers hurt and killed in an ambush, and calling for us to look to ourselves for change, it was too much for Minneapolis police officers to take.

The Star Tribune reports the four officers, working an off-hours gig, walked off the job at Saturday’s game.

“If [the players] are going to keep their stance, all officers may refuse to work there,” police union boss Lt. Bob Kroll told reporter Randy Furst.

“We do not, in any way, condone violence against the men and women who serve on our police force,” superstar Maya Moore said in a statement. “Senseless violence and retaliation will not bring us peace”

Question: When police walk out over such a sentiment, what is their message?

It wasn’t just the Lynx showing a social conscience this weekend. So did the New York Liberty, who play the Lynx at Target Center on Friday.

“Five cops gave their lives up trying to protect a peaceful movement,” New York Liberty player Swin Cash told the New York Times. “And in this country, I do believe that you can assemble peacefully and protest against injustice. So until the system transforms, we cannot sit here and act like there is not a problem here in America.”

Question: When police walk out over such a sentiment, what is their message?

The WNBA issued a statement saying “all of us are deeply troubled and concerned by the needless violence and loss of life, and we recognize that positive change starts with all of us standing up for the values we cherish — diversity, inclusiveness, and respect for others. We will keep these families in our thoughts as we continue to work to build stronger, safer, communities.”

Question: When police walk out over such a sentiment, what is their message?

It took courage for the players to make their statement, Lynx coach Cheryl Reeve said.

What’s it take to walk out?

“They only have four officers working the event because the Lynx have such a pathetic draw,” Kroll told the Strib, moving the petty-o-meter and insulting thousands of fans who support the Lynx and allow the off-duty officers to make a good chunk of change without heavy lifting.

“Rushing to judgment before the facts are in is unwarranted and reckless,” he said.

“Racial profiling is a problem. Senseless violence is a problem. The divide is way too big between our communities and those who have vowed to protect and serve us,” Lynx player Rebekkah Brunson said.

In disengaging over a call to come together, four Minneapolis cops and a union boss did their part to be sure it stays that way.

Related commentary: When it comes to policing, don’t we all want the same thing? (Star Tribune)

[Update 12:15 p.m.]-

Update 2:02 p.m. — Mayor Betsy Hodges checks in.

  • Mike

    That’s par for the course for Minneapolis cops. The attitude seems to be, “We get to continue our brutality at taxpayer expense. If you have a problem with that, it means you hate cops.”

    I’ve heard Kroll speak on NPR on several occasions. It’s amazing how tone-deaf the man is. Apparently there was never a problem anywhere that was the fault of the police.

    Another question: why do our elected so-called leaders in Minneapolis refuse to hold the police accountable no matter who’s mayor or leads the city council? The vapid and clueless Betsy Hodges is in way over her head, but her predecessors did no better.

    • ganderdavis

      Mike if it’s so bad there then why isn’t it on the front page news all the time.Your the type who takes a small % of cases of abuse of power and forget to also post the large population that this happens in.Are some cops bad and wrong for the job ? YES !! But what if one Mike killed someone could we just say ALL Mikes are bad ???? The injustice is how blowhard blast cops till one day they need their help and cry like little girls to get it.Oh but don’t let those bad cops show up a second late or else out comes the same old pissing and moaning. Stop with that talk and get out and do something if you feel things need to be changed.The story here has two sides and both might be right and wrong but there are two sides. Maybe the media needs to stop with the lopsided news stories and tell all the FACTS.As for these basketball players they have a right to how they show support but so do those officers and sorry to burst your hate bubble but they both are right !!

  • lynn

    with imbeciles like “union boss troll” in the lead, it is no wonder we are stuck in bigotry.

    • John Maddening

      Kroll (and his Saint Paul counterpart Dave Titus) do far more harm than good. They make all cops, good and bad, seem like one homogenous unit that does not want to take responsibility for its actions. I’ve had really good relations with the SPPD officers I have met, and none of them seem to like their union/federation leadership — how do these people continue to get elected?

  • L. Foonimin

    I’m wondering if this issue could have been avoided if the tee shirt design had listed the names of the 5 Dallas Officers instead of the DPD logo … they were all unique individuals and not just a faceless part of an us versus them mentality.

    • Neil

      I guess. On the other hand, there is usually *something* that I could have done to prevent my children from having a tantrum, but that doesn’t mean it’s my fault when they do.

    • Simon Templar

      the men shot dead were more than faceless people but the police seem to take it as just another day at the office… nothing to see here.

  • wjc

    Maybe we can help elevate the level of discourse by discussing the issue and leaving out the insulting language (clueless, vapid, imbeciles).

    That said, we need some city leadership on this issue. The police need to accept some responsibility when they make mistakes if anything is going to get better.

    • Simon Templar

      police admitting to anything is just hard to imagine but you are right, we need them to stop the aggro dictator thing…

    • MarkUp

      Part of the problem is disjointed leadership in Minneapolis. Mayor Hodges and Chief Harteau give tempered political statements trying to diffuse the situation. Kroll has taken every opportunity to publicly “side with the cops” even if it means deepening divides between the community and police. Kroll’s words often work against the efforts of Hodges and Harteau.

      Contrast this relationship to former Chief Smith, Mayor Coleman, and Union President Dave Titus in St. Paul. When they appear in the press they seem more united than their Minneapolis counterparts.

    • Ryan Johnson

      And that is the crux of the problem. There just doesn’t seem to be an ability to stand up and say “Sorry folks, I done effed up.” As long as that doesn’t happen no one can move forward. Until someone gives voice to the errors in judgement that bring about these events they will continue to occur. But the myth of infallibility seems to be hard to break.

  • Rob

    Guess there’s a new motto for the Mpls police: “To protect and serve – until you dare to call out racial injustice.”

    • MissoHawney

      They were off duty moonlighting, They’s under no obligation to work for the benefit of racists who call for their execution.

      BLM up until the point it involves policing your own kind

      • Simon Templar

        you and many like you have the wrong definition of the word “racist”. i know it does not matter to people like you, you just want minorities to take it and keep the supremacy fantasy alive…

        rac·ist
        ˈrāsəst/
        noun
        noun: racist; plural noun: racists
        1.
        a person who believes that a particular race is superior to another.
        synonyms:racial bigot, racialist, xenophobe, chauvinist, supremacist “he was exposed as a racist”
        (racially) discriminatory, racialist, prejudiced, bigoted
        “a racist society”
        adjective
        noun: racist; plural noun: racists; adjective: racist
        1.
        having or showing the belief that a particular race is superior to another.”we are investigating complaints about racist abuse at the club”

        NOTHING LIKE BLACK LIVES MATTER… but nice try, tell em what they won merv! they won, NADDA!

      • BReynolds33

        Wait. So you think the Lynx called for the execution of cops? I’m not quite sure what to even say to that level of ignorance.

  • Gary F

    Kroll seems to have a history of saying something stupid to discredit his argument.

    • Malik

      The problem with the US police shootings is the rules of engagement that police have. Any perceived danger and they can execute citizens at will. This obviously is not tolerable, they are not the army, they are not at war. Unless there is an actual deadly attack attempt on them were self-defense is justified, then they are plain murdering citizens.

      It’s time for a change in the way we police. I think our president needs to do more to stop this. Don’t get me wrong – I think Obama is doing a great job in office.

      RECORD unemployment numbers, legalized gay marriage, 5% growth, best year for jobs since 1999, consumer confidence up, deficit down 60% in 2014, gas prices low, health insurance cheaper than ever ($85/month), car insurance cheaper than ever ($25/month from Insurance Panda), the 1% starting to be taxed more; all while republicans bleated about Benghazi… but when it comes to policing and race, I think Obama could be doing more!

      The US political system is broken, dysfunctional and corrupt, so not help there. It will take a hero lawyer to challenge the notions of ‘self-defense’ to bring this genocide to an end.

      • Gary F

        sure

      • Simon Templar

        nice thoughtful post, the haters will (well) hate it…

      • MadMN

        This is an ad for Insurance Panda. I’ve seen the same copy in other comment sections – connect to Obama, paste. Lame.

    • Ms. Lorna

      Maybe he knows that blacks, who are about 15% of the population, commit about 2/3 of all U.S. murders. Those are FBI numbers. BLM is becoming a front for bad behavior.

      • Neil

        Weird. I just went to the FBI website and in 2014, whites committed 48% of all murders.

        • Kassie

          And being that the justice system is not fair, often whites can get their charges reduced to manslaughter or can hire high end lawyers who get them off of charges completely, so those numbers are probably even higher.

  • rosswilliams

    I think its important to remember that Kroll was elected by police to represent them as a collective group. His comments reflect the the gang culture that permeates policing in the United States. Gang members look out for one another. Any criticism of any individual gang member from outside the gang , no matter how mild or accurate, is a disrespectful attack on the entire gang. And any criticism from within the gang by a member is a betrayal. Its the reason its so hard to police the police. The culture demands that the good cops still have the backs of bad cops.

    • Jeff

      You see the same behavior with teachers unions as well, the union will always defend the teacher and demand a massive payout if the teacher is going to lose their job even if the teacher is 100% in the wrong.

      Unions and gangs are quite similar…they extort their dues from their members no matter if the individual member wants to support them or not.

      • Angry Jonny

        First off, that’s a pretty gross mis-characterization of how unions, especially the teacher’s union, works. As a kid of a 2-teacher household, it was fairly apparent how teachers would have been treated by administration if not for collective bargaining. How would you define “100% wrong”? I’m pretty sure that teachers convicted of gross improprieties to students don’t get a severance package, and the union does little to support that.

        • Jeff

          Here are a few examples of bad teachers being defended by their union:

          http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/06/17/dirty-dozen-12-bad-teachers-who-tenure-and-unions-protected.html

          • Angry Jonny
          • Jeff

            That’s called the genetic fallacy, instead of confronting the actual points and facts I presented you simply attacked the source. Sure, Fox News sucks, but they do cover some issues that the mainstream media won’t touch; by completely rejecting EVERY Fox News story you did the SAME EXACT thing Mr. Kroll did by rejecting all BLM’s stances/points.

          • Angry Jonny

            And you committed the fallacy fallacy, assuming that since I committed a fallacy in my rebuttal to your argument, my entire argument must be invalid. I would also argue that since Fox news has a storied and documented history of biased, inaccurate, and partisan “reporting”, a priori rejecting them as a valid source supporting your argument is wholly not without cause. There is also nothing preventing you from citing sources other than Fox news that register a little higher on the truth-o-meter.

          • Jeff

            Never once did I say you were 100% wrong, I said I don’t like Fox news either but you cannot simply reject a news source 100% of the time because there are some cases where they got the facts wrong…almost no news source could stand up to that standard.

            I did not nullify your entire point, instead I asked for you to have some self reflection that your bias about the source made you unable to see the facts within that news source and that you should take a moment and read the article to come to your own conclusion…now asking for self reflection is the fallacy fallacy???

          • Michael Bean

            First, Faux Noise is wrong/lying MOST of the time, and when they don’t outright lie, they put an extreme right-handed spin on a story, they are NOT JOURNALISTS, they are thinly disguised Republican shills!
            That blurb had 12 examples over many years in many different states out of some 13 million teachers in the USA, that’s a tiny, infinitesimal fraction of 1%, and we’re supposed to get all excited about that? I’m here to tell you that most enterprises would be jealous of that “problem.”
            So what’s the answer Jeff? Hand all public education over to private enterprise and get rid of those pesky unions? If you privatize everything the government now does, you will pay more for all of it, guaranteed.

          • Jeff

            Did you read the article??? Does it have valid points or will continue to “go off” on Fox News because it’s easier than confronting the facts within the article you don’t like reading?

          • Michael Bean

            Why don’t you respond to what I posted? In every endeavor/business there will always be bad players, but the bad players don’t represent the majority. To harp on such a small, insignificant percentage of the total as if they are the typical example is totally disingenuous at best. I won’t source Faux Noise for the reasons I mentioned in my previous post, too much of what they “report” is nearly pure bull shit with a right handed twist. Why would anyone with even minimal cognitive abilities trust such an unreliable source unless they are comfortable residing in the big bubble of lies? Facts are far and few in between in their vortex of deceit. Do you understand now?

          • Jeff

            Yes, I understand, you doubled down on the genetic fallacy and followed up with the sunk cost fallacy and simply won’t give up on your original assumptions, if you’d like to discuss the issues/facts in the article then I’m open to that…if you want to continue down the genetic fallacy path and triple down your sunk cost fallacy then continue on without me because your mind will have been closed and there is no point in debating.

          • HS English Teacher in MN

            I notice we are discussing the actions of the MN Lynx, Minneapolis officers, and there isn’t one MN teacher on your fox news list. Doesn’t work that way here. Proud of the professionalism shown by EdMN.

          • Jeff
          • Michael Bean

            Because we don’t live in the Garden of Eden like you. The real world has a lot of problems to deal with, and we’ll tackle them one by one, striving for the “more perfect union” mentioned in the Preamble to the US Constitution. You will probably just sit around grumbling and criticizing all that “libtard stuff” you hate. Amirite?

          • Jeff
      • Anna

        I dare you to walk into a St. Paul or Minneapolis classroom and substitute teach.

        I dare you to walk on to a medical/surgical floor in a hospital, any hospital and carry a load of 12-14 patients which is what many nurses around the country are doing today at this very moment.

        When frontline workers no longer fit into the bottom line, oops, profit margin, their jobs are toast and the remaining workers are expected to pick up the slack.

        Welcome to the new capitalism, where jobs are not secure and the pay is lousy. This is why unions were formed in the first place.

        • Jeff

          I would gladly enter a classroom and use my skills to teach but the teachers union won’t let me into the classroom without going back to school and getting an education degree.

          • Laura

            Wait, you’re saying the union wants you to be qualified and trained in order to do a difficult and high-stakes job?! The nerve of them!

          • Jeff

            No they set up barriers where someone who is knowledgeable and dedicated to teaching will have to go back to school to get a master’s degree in education (easiest, quickest path for someone with a 4 year degree) before they can set foot in a classroom. It’s protectionism at it’s best…apparently my electrical engineering degree, 10+ years in the fields of aviation & software development doesn’t qualify me to teach calculus, physics, computer programming in a high school. Meanwhile, I seem to recall when I was high school our “computer programming” teacher drew the short straw and was attempting to learn the subject matter on the job and was teaching programming in a language that was dead for 10+ years. Yeah, we want schools promoting protectionism over extremely important and valuable STEM skills, because it’s for the kids, right???

          • Laura

            Expertise in your field is extremely valuable. But you’re saying that your experience of a poor teacher (from how long ago…?) equates to today’s high teacher standards. There’s more to teaching than subject mastery. Even teachers who got their undergrad in education go on to get their masters degree.

          • Jeff

            Okay, please clearly explain all the programming languages available to learn at your local high school…how about micro-controller instruction and do you think the school could offer more courses if engineers/scientists were offered fast tracks into the teaching fields (with bonuses offered for experience in those high value fiends)? I think almost every high school offers an after school robotics program but couldn’t they go further? I’m willing to help, I’ve even volunteered through code.org but I never heard anything back from my local schools.

          • Laura

            I repeat: expertise is extremely valuable, but that’s not all it takes.

            Your desire to help in your local schools is commendable, but blaming the unions for the barriers you have faced is misguided.

          • Jeff

            No I was curious…what programming languages are available for the students are your local high school? I don’t disagree that there is some pedagogy when it comes to teaching but that shouldn’t take years upon years of courses, there should be a fast track to get qualified people into the classroom within a 6 month period of time, if they’re willing to work full-time at it without requiring an additional full degree in education.

          • Justin Rach

            You’re ignoring her point about expertise in education. I’m curious: how would you explain to a distraught high schooler -any- of the basic programming languages that are available in high school? How would you tell if a high schooler was upset, obstinate, a disruption, bored and in need of challenge, overwhelmed and tuning out? Maybe they have a learning disability?

            I’m not saying a union guarantees that a teacher is qualified, but standards in education are better than casting a net to professionals in the community, willing or no.

            As far as years upon years, it’s not. Adding an education minor, I believe (when I went through school back in the 90’s) was an additional year to a year and a half, depending on what classes you’d already taken. If you leave school and have to go back, yes, I suppose you’d need some schooling, but the basics of child psychology you’d need grounding in, I think, takes more than a crash course.

          • Jeff

            A year to a year and a half is a master’s degree full time…

          • rosswilliams

            “.apparently my electrical engineering degree, 10+ years in the fields of aviation & software development doesn’t qualify me to teach calculus, physics, computer programming in a high school”

            Precisely. And you don’t realize that because you don’t have any training as a teacher. Ignorance is bliss.

            ” was teaching programming in a language that was dead for 10+ years.”

            Sort of like teaching greek or latin right? You have to learn a programming language to learn programming, but that isn’t the point of learning programming. The chances are pretty good the language you learn to program with in high school will be either dead or changed to something barely recognizable by the time you are in the work force. Most current programming languages are object-oriented, but I don’t think I would use them to introduce someone to programming. But I am not a teacher, so I don’t really know. I am smart enough to know I don’t know.

          • Jeff

            Greek and Latin are wonderful languages to learn, but guess what…we don’t teach them in high school due to the lack of value to our society at that level of education. Instead we teach French, Spanish and German (sometimes Mandarin Chinese) because it will offer the most benefit for students, your comparison to Greek/Latin are quite apt…if people want to learn dead languages in college, go for it but in high schools we should be teaching languages that are most often used in this world like C++, Java, HTML, SQL, C#, JavaScript or PHP. Instead I learned PASCAL (which doesn’t even register as the top 50 languages and was dead for 10 years before I learned it!) and that actually turned me off of computer programming until I went to college and learned a much more intuitive, common and useful language like C++ (which I’m actually using at this very moment!).

            I want kids today to see the value of learning a skill that they can use and even jump into a job with immediately versus going through the motion and becoming discouraged with learning something they’ll never use again.

          • rosswilliams

            ” Instead I learned PASCAL (which doesn’t even register as the top 50 languages and was dead for 10 years before I learned it!)”

            I doubt it. PASCAL is still used, check out Delphi. And yes, that is pretty close to dead as a working language.

            It was used in education because it doesn’t have a lot of the idiosyncrasies introduced into other languages for productivity reasons. That is useful if you are teaching programming as a general discipline, rather than a specific language.

          • Anna

            In the state of Minnesota you can substitute teach provided you have a bachelor’s degree. I don’t know where you live, Jeff but in some states all you need is a high school diploma.

            In Maryland they pay substitute teachers based on their level of education. Those with certification get paid higher than those with a bachelor degree but you don’t need to be certified in a subject area to substitute teach.

            Any high school educator in math or science would be thrilled to have you teaching their classes.

            I teach all grade levels and all subjects, some better than others but I do it because I love it and it pays the bills since I was forced to retire from professional nursing due to bone density issues. I have what is called a short-call sub license which means I can teach continuously in the same classroom for up to two weeks.

            After a certain number of days teaching, my pay increases by about a $1 an hour.

            The person makes the teacher, the same as it is for nursing. I’ve known some people with degrees in engineering like yours that are sometimes better teachers than those with an education certification.

            One other lovely thing about substitute teaching is it’s similar to grandchildren. You can give them back!

          • rosswilliams

            I would gladly go into a clinic and use my skills to cure disease but those pesky medical associations won’t let me without a medical degree.

            The difference here is that the “teachers union(s)” aren’t the ones hiring teachers or setting the educational standards required for teachers. Those are set by school boards and state government.

          • Jeff

            You do realize that the teachers union demands union members and union heads sit on those same boards…

            BTW, c’mon into the engineering field, we’ll welcome you with open arms…no certificates or protectionist hoops to jump through. In fact, pick up a book or order a kit and start creating! I recommend starting with this kit, going through the course and learning about circuits & coding right away:

            https://www.arduino.cc/

          • Jeff

            What degrees did Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg have when they started their companies?

      • Unions are supposed to defend the process, not the individual. Collective bargaining lays out a process for terminating an employee for cause. Unions make sure that process is followed.

      • Dan

        Teacher gangs.
        You have to spell “syllabus” as part of the initiation.

    • Simon Templar

      and that, is the crux of why i don’t trust ANY police. they don’t police themselves and let the “bad apples” get away with, well, murder… it it were a citizen that did that we’d be locked up for accessory to the fact, accomplice to the fact or whatever they have for when you know but allow it to happen…

    • Angry Jonny

      I don’t know if I’d compare gangs with unions, but I take your meaning.

      • Justin Rach

        He’s not. he’s comparing the culture of this -particular- union to a gang.

        • rosswilliams

          Actually it has nothing to do with the union, it is the culture of police departments. The union leadership is reflecting that culture, it doesn’t create it.

          The idea of police as a gang is hardly original. I think I first heard the idea of police as the toughest gang in the neighborhood over 35 years ago from then Minneapolis Police Chief Tony Bouza.

    • Dmann16

      It’s all gangs…just different kinds, good point…when a group is together and they all believe in one thing or have one goal in common then that’s a gang to me ijs..Police, Sherriff’s, army, navy, Senate, government.

    • ganderdavis

      I just hope a-holes like you never need those gang members to come and protect your sorry ass.To many ass wipes post their BS about cops just to be mouthing off. LEO’s should just say FY to jerk offs like you and tell you to protect your own sorry ass.Maybe blacks need to get off their poor me and stop challenging police with an attitude right off the bat.And no that isn’t all blacks but you will find a large percentage start off the conversation with a challenging tone. And police don’t like that from anyone.Learn to just take the ticket and fight it in court. To look at the so called stats people keep bringing up how about posting the population of this country. How about putting the percentage of people who are killed by smoking,alcohol,automobiles,military,heart attacks, and stupid people in general that kill more people then cops do yet wheres your anger at that.Are people being killed for what seems to be a rush to shoot ? YES But like not all blacks are bad neither are all LEO’s so stop putting all of them in the same basket.This country is headed for a race war and that’s just what the left wants.Declare marshal law and snatch all the guns people have and take over.IMHO

      • Normally I would delete this.

        But it basically everything the Lynx players were saying. So, pick a side. There’s one.

      • Jay T. Berken

        You need a hug.

        • Greg438

          …and to repeat third grade English.

      • Eamon

        “Are people being killed for what seems to be a rush to shoot ? YES But like not all blacks are bad neither are all LEO’s so stop putting all of them in the same basket.”

        I think this is a great point and one that’s often missed. BLM and LEO are both saying, “Stop stereotyping us” (blacks as dangerous criminals, cops as murderous racists). But as a public agency, it’s very frustrating that the law enforcement community hasn’t made much progress towards calling out the injustices within their own ranks. If there are a few bad cops, shouldn’t the police be doing more to weed them out or provide the appropriate training/recourse? So far the response has been very defensive and reactionary. When someone like Kroll (who effectively speaks for all LEOs) comes out and says what he said, how are we supposed to not question the role of the union in helping or hurting progress? Where I disagree with you is your implied assertion that this is a BLM vs LEO fight, and I strongly believe that both sides need to work together. How is that supposed to happen when the four law enforcement officers walked away?

      • rosswilliams

        That’s really my point. There are a handful of bad cops out there that agree with you and the good cops don’t stand up to them. The result is that many people come to believe, as you apparently do, that the bad cops are the rule, rather than an exception.

  • PaulJ

    It sounds like the cops are saying they disagree with the idea that there is a systemic problem with police behavior. In an era of demonstrating for your viewpoint, their action didn’t unreasonable.

    • BReynolds33

      Or, they could have sat there and accepted the small bit of criticism, applauded others crying out for a bit of sanity from both sides, and presented their side. Walking out on a job you agreed to do is a temper tantrum.

  • kat

    The police unions remind me of toddlers- give a little gentle correction or point out an error and they stomp their feet and scream about the injustice of it all. Police culture tells us “either let us do our job however we want, or deal with crime yourselves” – It is an unfair and untenable position.

  • JamieHX

    Bob, your language is inflammatory. “Union boss” is what Republicans and other union haters say. They and you clearly use that language to show your contempt for unions. And when he said that The Lynx draw is pathetic, he could have been saying it’s pathetic that more people don’t come out to support The Lynx. That’s how I read it.

    The Mpls. police officers were simply conveying the message that, as usual, people are jumping to conclusions before all the facts are known. Plus, the T-shirt and the messages from the Lynx and the other team very clearly say that the Dallas police officers’ lives are not as important as the civilians’ lives. It was like, “oh, and Dallas police, too…”

    • The players are saying there’s a problem in America. Those who disagree with them are saying there’s not. Period.

      • wendywulff

        Not necessarily. You can disagree about the nature of the problem, or the tactics, or the demands that Black Lives Matter are posting as solutions, or the allegations of what police think, feel and do. That doesn’t mean you support the status quo.

      • JamieHX

        You KNOW it is not that simple.

        • BJ

          So there isn’t a problem?

          How big that problem is could be debateable.
          What the solutions to the problem can be debateable.
          That there is a problem really, really, isn’t debatable.

          • PaulJ

            No, there’s lots of problems. This issue seems to revolve around who is getting the blame for a particular problem (police brutality).

    • Jay T. Berken

      “And when he said that The Lynx draw is pathetic, he could have been saying it’s pathetic that more people don’t come out to support The Lynx.”

      No, he is just a sexist a-hole trying to put these ‘little women’ in their place.

  • Katie Nadeau

    Wonder if letting the officers know what the players planned to do beforehand would have allowed them to thoughtfully respond instead of abruptly react.

    • Dan

      I’d guess the players didn’t even think about the fact the off-duty MPD were providing security there, which may have also been part of the message.

    • Kassie

      I’m pretty sure I saw pictures of what they were planning to wear on Facebook before the game. I’m guessing the officers did too and they were ready. If they were doing their jobs, it would be unlikely that all four would notice the warmups and somehow all decide to quit. It was planned ahead of time.

      • Dan

        Don’t know if the officers were checking the Lynx Facebook page or not, but if so, it wouldn’t exactly be the same as being approached by the players.
        As for coordination, it wouldn’t take much, there were only four of them. e.g., “You seeing this? I’m outta here” “Me too” “Me too” “Me too”

  • Jeff

    Did the Lynx have a comment about the incident where 2 children were shot and 1 died, last weekend?

    Mr. Kroll is stuck on his side of the argument, we need to be open to solve this problem by talking about it. He has some valid points about past narratives being false/wrong…the Michael Brown and Jamar Clark stories were proven in local AND federal investigations to have no basis in reality, but he should take a moment and keep an open mind on the Philando Castile shooting because it doesn’t appear to fall into the same false narrative category as those other shootings. We can’t know for sure until there is a full investigation and perhaps the dash cam video comes out. We need to get more facts and more information but we can’t just run to our sides and suggest our side is right…while ignoring other groups.

    • BJ

      >the Michael Brown and Jamar Clark stories were proven in a court of law to have no basis in reality,

      by court of law are you implying a Trial?

      Jamar Clark didn’t go to a court, at all, not even a grand jury.

      Neither did Michael Brown – grand jury did not indict, Justice department investigation didn’t find any civil rights violations in the shooting.

      Neither proven in a court of law to have no basis in reality.

      • Jeff

        There you go, changed it to read local AND federal investigations coming to the same conclusions. If there was even a hint at the evidence pointing at officer wrongdoing there would have been a grand jury or trial.

        • BJ

          > proven in local AND federal investigations to have no basis in reality

          OK lets try this again.

          Just because no charges, don’t mean that there was justice. Doesn’t mean that what happened was legal or right. It mainly just means that people who have felt hard done by the legal system see this as just another example of people of color not getting the same treatment as non people of color in the justice system.

          • Jeff

            Okay, let’s try this again, if you want to prosecute and press charges you NEED evidence, all the evidence pointed at the police officers’ stories being true and the narrative of BLM being incorrect (hands up, don’t shoot; Jamar was handcuffed; etc.).

          • Ryan Johnson

            No, the evidence was insufficient to prove that the officer’s stories were false. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

          • Curmudge

            Bottom line was that in all these cases the legal system ruled in favor of the officers. While the opinions of amateurs are amusing, they are also just opinions……and most are outrageously biased. The Castile case has zero chance based on the video in which the primary witness admits she’s been smoking pot and the suspect who failed to obey the officer was also smoking pot. There will be no charges against the officer.

          • Ryan Johnson

            The legal system declined to prosecute due to insufficient evidence, that is not a ruling in favor of the officers. It is a hold until more information comes to light. Besides which, prosecution is not the end all to justice. A drunk driver can still feel guilt after serving a sentence, a murderer can get off on technicalities, and innocent men can, and have been executed. The judicial system only presents a rough, albeit balanced, approach to real justice. That’s the difference between morality and ethics.

            Also, it was in possession of pot, not “were under the influence of.” Something that’s true of some 12% of the population on a given day, and nearly 50% of the population at some time in their lives. Were the officers tested for drugs and alcohol within and hour of the event? Because if I hurt myself or another at work I would have been.

          • Curmudge

            No, she said, “We HAD some weed,” as I recall it. Since that can mean smoked, her testimony is worthless. End of story.

            As for the officers in other cases, they will feel no guilt for the simple reason that they did nothing wrong……..as much as you’d like to invent something. 🙂

          • Veronica

            Well, and with your logic, there wasn’t much for the Lynx to say about a dead child, since nobody knows who shot the gun. It could have been anyone. It could have been an accident.

            And what we’re really fighting for is a world where people who break the law have a chance for due process–You know, the due process the Aurora shooter is getting, or the due process the man who shot a ton of people in CO outside a Planned Parenthood, Timothy McVeigh– arrested, a real trial, and a chance to sort things out.

            What we’re tired of is the modern-day lynching, the execution coming before a trial, expecting justice to be done after a man is dead. And I’m tired of privileged white men thinking they have the right to LITERALLY be judge, jury, and executioner.

          • Jeff

            I agree, police shouldn’t be shooting people unless that person poses a danger to the police officer or other people around them. I think in the Jamar Clark or Michael Brown cases the evidence did show that there was a danger to other people and the shootings were warranted…the Philando Castile case is quite different based on the Facebook video, I’d want to see a full local and federal investigation along with the dash cam video to determine if the shooting in that case was warranted…right now I’d have to suggest it isn’t but that’s based on an after-the-fact video.

          • Veronica

            Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin…say their names. Say all of them. These are only some.

          • Jeff

            Tamir Rice, it was an unfortunate accident, I could see the officer(s) involved being fired or reprimanded for his actions where he responded too quickly but in his eyes there was a weapon and it was being aimed at him and the 911 operator did not relay the information about a fake gun…no criminal charges is the right option there. There should and was a massive payout to the family.

            Sandra Bland, the officer was probably fired and should have been if not, the officer should face some criminal charges for violating her civil rights…but she did commit suicide and her family should be paid by the government.

            Eric Garner, that was bad training that officer was reprimanded and probably should have lost his job, the family should and did receive a massive civil suit payout (settlement). Criminal charges, maybe for assault but he was trying to restrain a person (incorrectly) worst case involuntary manslaughter, I could see pushing for that.

            Trayvon Martin was an odd situation, between 2 citizens and there did appear to be an assault against Zimmerman as per the witnesses and injuries. Zimmerman is obviously a bad guy and possibly Martin’s family could win a civil suit but it was such a confusing and bad situation on both sides as soon as Martin brought Zimmerman to the ground and continued his assault that’s when Zimmerman had every right to use a firearm to defend himself. No criminal charges was appropriate.

            I don’t forget and I do follow these unfortunate deaths and I’ve drawn my own conclusions on each an every case, I would NEVER lump all those deaths into the same category and I’m particularly interested in following the Castile case since it is by far the best case I’ve ever seen for possibly getting a criminal prosecution against a police officer (which I support based on the video I’ve seen so far).

          • Veronica

            No, no, no…..you’re ignoring what I and others are saying. Racial bias means that more often the white suspects doing harm or presenting danger to others more often get arrested, but the black and brown people get shot. THAT is the bias. I promise you if my white son was running around the park with a fake gun he wouldn’t have been shot to death within 2 seconds of arrival by an officer..

          • Jeff

            A new study shows that black people are less likely to be shot by police than other groups even though it does appear police do use disproportionately more force against black people.

            http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/12/upshot/surprising-new-evidence-shows-bias-in-police-use-of-force-but-not-in-shootings.html

          • Curmudge

            Which can easily be interpreted to mean that black people resist arrest more often. All in all, that report destroys the current false narrative from BlackLivesMatter that blacks are treated unfairly.

  • Vernon Thorson

    Bob Collins, have you paid attention to the things BLM advocate? They are calling for cop and white people killings(from some of their leaders no less). How can you not walk off the job when players saying they support this group but not all cops? Maybe if you would report the whole story instead of going for one side of the story you could some day be taken as legitimate. Until then, nope.

    • What’s your solution, Vernon?

      • Vernon Thorson

        Why don’t you ask the elected representatives? My solution would be to not back a group that many consider racist and almost a terrorist group, without backing all cops. When BLM can do what they want in a peaceful manner then back them as a group. As for the injustices, if you recall many have been ruled not so by lawyers. If the people creating the violence want better actions then they need to be part of the solution instead of creating more problems where more people get hurt. My part in this is to help you do your job of being impartial when doing news or just say it is your opinion and fewer people will be upset when you write. Journalism is a dying art as too many put their views into it instead of being open minded and impartial.

        • I’m asking you what your solution to the current problem, best described by Dr. David Brown, is.

          If they need to be part of the solution and you don’t think they are, what’s the solution?

        • Jay T. Berken

          “If the people creating the violence want better actions then they need to be part of the solution instead of creating more problems where more people get hurt.”

          You know that the police are the ones who killed two men, right? This is what is started the BLM protest.

          • Vernon Thorson

            When it is all said and done the cops will have been vindicated also. 2 things can be learned from this, do exactly what the police ask of you and help your community clean up the criminal element then incidents like this will be les apt to happen. We need our elected representatives to work on creating jobs that have value and not just raise minimum wage. Quit giving things to people will also help, if a person is required to do something for that which they receive, then they will feel better and want more of that accomplishment. It all starts with the individual and their actions. Just because the police get found to be within their rights doesn’t mean they are wrong because people disagree with it. What if whites reacted like the blacks every time a black person killed a white person? Actions don’t get vindicated because someone wants it to be that way.

          • Jay T. Berken

            Don’t for get about the drugs; crack is running ramps all over the country. Then you will have the trifecta of what is wrong with blacks talking points. What you said is nothing new and not true.

    • BJ

      >have you paid attention to the things BLM advocate?

      Have you?

      NO “leaders” have called for cop and white people killings. All, real leaders of the movement, have spoke out against those people who have said those types of things.

      • Vernon Thorson

        You had better check up on that as leaders have called for just that. there are recent videos even of them calling for the deaths of cops. Do a search on the internet, and if you tell me these aren’t BLM leaders then where are they to quell this behavior? The only time that anyone has called for that is after the 5 cops got killed. A little too late to change your story.

        • There was the Pigs in a Blanket chant at the State Fair protest that riled cops the governor and other people, as well as it should have.

          http://www.twincities.com/2015/09/01/mark-dayton-black-lives-matters-pigs-chant-a-terrible-thing-to-say/

          What else/

          • Vernon Thorson

            Do a computer search. And if these weren’t the BLM leaders where were they at these protests done in their name?

          • Who are the BLM leaders?

          • MarkUp

            I’ve been wondering that myself. When news outlets report a statement from BLM, who are they actually citing? Is there an official channel they communicate through, other than facebook and twitter handles?

            Do you think designated leadership would help or hinder BLM’s message in any way? It’s doing nightmares for the city of Minneapolis…

    • Curmudge

      Interesting that BlackLivesMatter seems to support only DEAD cops while throwing large chunks of concrete at the live ones. That is something to ponder.

  • Just_Saying

    Not many white liberals would put their kids into a black or Hispanic school, so why are they pushing to flood our communities with these people?

    • “these people”

      And there it is.

      Once you peel away the rhetoric, once you peel away the theatrics, once you peel away the faux outrage, this is where you ALWAYS end up.

      “these people”

      • “These people” who don’t use their real names to comment seem to make the most racist comments…

  • lindblomeagles

    As I’ve said before, I don’t think we as a nation can say Black Lives Matter doesn’t have a point anymore. Not every police officer is a bad cop. Most of them do good work. But, it is clear, some of them exercise poor judgment. Walking out of a Lynx Game because they are wearing T-shirts memorializing everybody that lost their lives last week was poor judgment. And if any Department in this town needed better community relations, it is the Minneapolis Police Department, who have had strained relationships with North Minneapolis during each of the last three Mayors Minneapolis has had, Sayles-Belton, Rybak, and the current administration.

  • Brian Johnson

    Great job police officers! They took a stance and so did you! Stay strong….

    • lynn

      i agree about taking a stance. the next strong stance the lynx can take is to hire a private security firm that would be delighted to protect and serve a loving and proud crowd.
      let the cops with poor decisions shoot themselves in the foot as they bite the hand that feeds them.

      • BJ

        I’m pretty sure they are required to use off duty MPLS PD for at least part of the security

  • Curmudge

    The Lynx and a lot of other well-intentioned but misguided people are simply supporting a tragic and destructive mindset. The real problem is a TOXIC cultural belief that has developed in some young black men. They feel they have A RIGHT to steal, assault, sell drugs and even kill
    because of past wrongs against black people and current lack of
    opportunity for a good life. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric
    Garner, Freddy Gray……all dead due to this feeling of being above the
    law…….being justified to TAKE whatever they want by whatever means
    needed. They were wrong. They are dead. That is the way it must be.
    Until people face that fact and quit supporting them……..the mayhem
    will continue.

    • Ima just gonna keep on posting this for those throwing the racial stereotypes around.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3moX-c4cOTM

    • crystals

      I…I don’t even know where to begin.

      I mean, I guess I appreciate that you’re at least putting it out there front and center (albeit anonymously) as opposed to the people who continue to hide their racism behind carefully worded statements and passive aggressive behaviors.

      Let’s be clear though: this is racist. This is deeply problematic. These kinds of beliefs are why we are where we are, NOT because of the actions of young black men.

    • Jerry

      Do you even know any black men?

      • Curmudge

        I’ve served with black men in the military, lived with them, eaten and drank with them, gone to church with them and changed black babies diapers. How about you?

        • Jerry

          And from that experience you think they are all thieves, drug dealers, and murderers? Must be awkward when you see them.

          • Curmudge

            What a silly statement, Jerry. I said SOME young black men, not all blacks. Read the post.

          • Jerry

            Thank god for the edit button, eh?

          • Curmudge

            Jerry, SOME young black men is PRECISELY what I mean. It should be obvious to anyone that ALL young black men do not break the law and resist arrest…….just some. We are both quite aware of that fact, I think. We are also probably both aware that the young black man in question was stopped 55 times by the police. Now one could try to make a case that it was racial profiling, but is anybody THAT black? Fifty-five TIMES black??? Are all black people stopped 55 times? I strongly suspect that some personal issues must be at work with numbers like that.

          • Jerry

            Oh good, you’re playing the “blame the victim” card.

          • Curmudge

            And you’re making facetious statements again.

  • Jerry

    Wow, lots of people commenting from under their rocks today.

  • Dave M

    I’m afraid Lt. Kroll doesn’t understand the situation. The Minneapolis police deserve someone who does.

    • Michael Bean

      He understands, don’t give him a pass. He’s also the one who instigated the “pointergate” crap, he’s a racist ass.

  • tboom

    I think their message is:

    It’s US versus THEM,
    It will always be US versus THEM,
    THEM is wrong, all THEM is wrong all the time,
    We will never accept the perspective of THEM,
    We will never accept the premise that anything US does could ever be improper,
    We will keep doing what we are doing because US are right,
    Go away.

  • Dan

    I’d guess the MPD officers don’t appreciate the flying of the BlackLivesMatter slogans, since BLM Minneapolis as an organization told anyone who would listen, for months, that one of their cops executed a handcuffed man in cold blood. The “murderer” style rhetoric is currently used against the sobbing cop crying “I told him not to reach for it!”

    I’m not a big fan of Mr. “If you’re not getting fouls, you’re not playing hard enough”, but Kroll also said “Rushing to judgment before the facts are in is unwarranted and reckless”. The two things above would probably be the message I’d interpret from their gesture.

  • As a Minneapolis resident, this doesn’t give me confidence about the fortitude of the city’s officers.

    • Kassie

      Exactly. And that’s where I thought this conversation would go. The police are completely unable to separate their personal feelings from their responsibility to protect and serve. While these were off duty cops and can do what they want, it shows they have no integrity to complete a job they committed to.

      • Curmudge

        If I went to a job and the employer spit in my face……I’d walk off, you bet I would.

        • Michael Bean

          So who “spit’ in anyone’s face? The jerseys had nothing to do with MPLS cops…AT ALL!

          • Curmudge

            Equating five murders with two justifiable homicides is spitting in the face of all cops.

          • Michael Bean

            And which “justifiable homicides” would you be referring to? In one incident I saw two police officers on top of a black man, one officer pulled his gun and shot the man point blank several times, it didn’t appear necessary from what I saw on the video. The other man shot in his girl friend’s car even told the chicken-shit officer that he had a carry permit and had it with him, he never touched the gun according to his girl friend. When he tried to comply to the officers demand for ID, the officer apparently got scared when he moved and pumped him full of lead.
            Where do you come up with this “justifiable” crap?

          • Curmudge

            Michael, your post indicates you believe the testimony of the girl friend……who also admitted on her video that they had been smoking pot. You do realize that her admission of being under the influence of drugs will destroy her value as a witness, right? The cop (who was not under the influence of drugs) said on the video that he told the man not to reach for it. There is no way any Grand Jury or D.A. is going to rule against the cop in that situation. Justifiable homicide.
            The case in Louisiana had a 300 pound man with a gun struggling to get his gun and refusing to stop reaching for it. In a split second he could have gotten to it and killed a police officer. Justifiable homicide.

          • // with two justifiable homicides

            About that ‘rushing to judgment thing’…

          • Curmudge

            There is ZERO credible evidence to indicate otherwise. If you have any, please share.

          • Curmudge

            You missed the obvious.

        • Kassie

          Anyone who works in a government job, including police, work for people who don’t appreciate them, think they are worthless, stupid and/or lazy, and should be fired or replaced. It is what you sign up for in a government job. Somehow thousands upon thousands of public employees across American can take that, but the police can’t.

          Also, did the Lynx actually do the hiring of the police, or did the facility?

  • Curmudge

    The problem (for those who can’t see it or refuse to acknowledge it) is that by putting all those names together……. the Lynx were equating the obvious and undisputed murder of police
    with what thus far appear to be totally justified shootings by police.
    That’s a grave insult.

    • HS English Teacher in MN

      What? I think there are large numbers of people who do not believe these police killings are justifiable in any way. Shooting an innocent person as they follow directions to produce ID, less than 2 minutes after the stop…
      … are you kidding?

      • Curmudge

        Their beliefs don’t square with the facts. Shooting a person who reaches for a gun when ordered to stop is indeed justified.

        • Curmudge

          The murders of Dallas police are undisputed murders. The two cases you mention are indeed disputed and that’s the difference. Bad move by the Lynx.

        • KTFoley

          The two people in question weren’t reaching for guns.

          • Curmudge

            And you know that how?

          • KTFoley

            Just out of curiosity, what % of the coverage that doesn’t fit your personal narrative are you actually reading with defenses down?

          • Curmudge

            This Castile case is so cut and dried that there is actually no need for defenses. The witness totally impugned her own testimony by openly admitting that she was on drugs.

        • Ryan Johnson

          Not rendering aid to a man who is bleeding out isn’t justified. Any sort of claims that a cooperative witness, a four year old, or an unconscious man somehow pose a danger are absurd. The failure to attempt to staunch the bleeding is at best a violation of the Good Samaritan Law (https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=604a.01), and an intentional attempt to eliminate a witness, AKA: Murder in the Second Degree, at worst. Doubly so when a second officer is present.

          • Curmudge

            That’s absurd. Study police history. Hundreds of officers have been killed by women with guns and hundreds of officers have been killed by supposedly unconscious men with guns who suddenly became conscious and pulled a trigger. The man was given aid as soon as the scene was secured and the other suspect was cuffed. Your comment only shows you know nothing about police work or the law.

          • Veronica

            No, no, no….I want the evidence you cite.

          • Curmudge

            Evidence of what?
            That a woman can kill with a gun? That an unconscious suspect with a gun can regain consciousness and pull a trigger?

          • Ryan Johnson

            Hundreds of officers have been killed by friendly fire. Are they therefore in a dangerous situation every time one of their colleagues is in line of sight? Over a hundred Officers take their own lives each year; the single biggest cause of death among law enforcement. Does that mean that an officer is in a dangerous situation any time they, themselves, are armed? No one with that level of paranoia should be allowed to own, let alone carry a gun. The totality of the situation was not dangerous by any reasonable standard.

            Moreover, aid was not given until a fire department EMT arrived. The officers delayed in securing the scene and giving aid. That alone was a mistake, albeit an understandable one given the trauma of the situation. And if the Officers at the scene weren’t trained in basic first aid (apply pressure, elevate the wound), then there is a serious problem in their department and/or professional training.

            To be fair, I have as much sympathy for Officer Yanez and his partner as I do Mr. Castille’s friends and family. I would rather see him take responsibility and make amends then face a lifetime of shame and regret. I certainly don’t want him to struggle with PTSD and eventually take his own life. That would be no more fair to his family then Castile’s death was. But for some reason, that response is precluded by some cultural phenomena amongst law enforcement. It seems that the honor of being right outweighs the personal and social benefits of admiting a mistake. This only serves to reduce the credibility of the police, as an institution, rather then reinforce it in the public, or at least my, eye.

          • Curmudge

            Ryan, you say that situation was not dangerous? That’s absurd. How long have you been a cop? What is your training and authority to evaluate that situation? One known hostile gun was involved and a perp was down, but a downed perp can and often has, faked it and then killed officers.

            Then there’s the woman passenger who could grab that gun or her own gun and kill an officer. Until both suspects are cuffed that is a hot and potentially deadly situation. Study a little criminology before you make such ridiculous statements. Aid was given as quickly as aid can be given in that situation. There is no question about that.
            Don’t waste your sympathy on the officer. He acted correctly and has no need of it. Unless some dramatic new evidence surfaces……he will not be charged.

          • Ryan Johnson

            My authority is “a reasonable person”, a common standard of law.

          • Curmudge

            Wrong.

          • Ryan Johnson

            I will have sympathy for Officer Yanez, even as I did for Dylann Roof (what terrible events led his life to that turn, and effectively ended it). Charges aren’t the end all be all of life. He was clearly distraught in the video and I can feel for him through that alone.

            How long have you been a minority? How many times have you been approached by an officer with a drawn weapon? How many times have you been stopped without cause? How about searched by a k-9 unit because you were in the “wrong neighborhood?”

            You can not make your own experiences any more valid then anyone else’s. Please, open your eyes and ears, or find a bigger rock than anonymity to crawl under.

          • Curmudge

            Dylan Roof was a crazy perp. Yanez is a good officer who did his job. If you can’t see the difference you have more problems than I thought. Have some sympathy for yourself. Do you want to know my name? Or is that just another weak excuse because you have no valid arguments?

        • You notice anything odd about this photograph?

          • Curmudge

            Yes, it’s reversed so it looks like the driver is a passenger. Possibly due to drug use by the operator of the camera.

          • Look again.

          • Curmudge

            If you want to make a claim of some kind, go ahead, Bob. I gave you the only thing odd about the video clip.

  • EmDub

    The Lynx’s warmup jersey included the emblem for the Dallas Police Department, and it also listed Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and Black Lives Matter. I am sure the four Minneapolis officers did not quit over the Lynx’s recognition of the tragedy to the Dallas Police Department.

    So what was their reason?

    This is not an issue of opposing sides. A person can support the police, feel grief about Castile and Sterling, and support Black Lives Matter.

    The officers’ actions are pretty revealing: What a sad and concerning statement about themselves and their biases!

    I hope Minneapolis and other police departments recognize–or start recognizing–how counterproductive positioning and opinions like theirs are, not just to community relations, but also to effective law enforcement.

  • foreseer2

    Does police responsibility to “protect and serve” stop when they disagree with your opinion? Is that what free speech means today? Isn’t a professional sporting event where a terrorist could do the most damage?

    If they felt strongly about this, then do your job for that night but refuse to take another assignment. As they are doing this on their own time, it is their right. However, walking off the job they agreed to take suggests that they may not have the professionalism and emotional stability to “protect and serve” everyone in the community.

  • remnimaat

    Considering the shirts the Lynx were wearing had what appears to be a Dallas PD-inspired image on it as well, apparently cops like walking out on cops.

  • Sunderta Kaur

    This would not have happened if it were the Timberwolves. Disrespect on so many levels.

    • Christin Crabtree

      Do you mean because they are men?

  • Glenda Burgeson

    I am disappointed by the comments of Lt. Kroll, and his churlishness was not helpful. The Lynx players made heartfelt, respectful calls for soul-searching and unity. Given the trauma of the past week, my guess is the officers are not ready to hear points of view other than their own.

  • crystals

    Mayor Hodges drops her mic and it is glorious:
    “Bob Kroll’s remarks about the Lynx are jackass remarks. Let me be clear: labor leadership inherently does not speak on behalf of management. Bob Kroll sure as hell doesn’t speak for me about the Lynx or about anything else.”

    • Veronica

      Well, there’s goes the pansy label someone called her below…

  • Laurie K.

    Too bad Lee Sjolander was not these officers union representative and leader.

  • KTFoley

    When it comes to the “you’re doing it wrong” commentary, this very timely quote from Jesse Williams (June 27, NAACP Image Awards) has been running around my head for the last several days:

    “If you have a critique for the resistance, for our resistance, then you better have an established record of critique of our oppression. If you have no interest, if you have no interest in equal rights for black people then do not make suggestions to those who do. Sit down.”

    It’s worthy because so much of the surrounding noise seems to indicate that we’re all for equality, provided that those who don’t have it make sure they reach for it in ways that meet our approval. It changed my reaction to protesters on the interstate, among other things.

  • Christin Crabtree

    I believe that as a white person, while I am certainly not a bigot, I do benefit (directly or indirectly, whether I want to or not) from a system built upon white supremacy. I cannot separate myself from the systemic oppression of black people; rather I must actively work to build a more equitable + just society. I can do this work by listening to black people, through reflective & honest (and sometimes uncomfortable) conversations, and through civic engagement. It is the duty of the oppressor to dismantle systems of oppression, not the oppressed’s duty to do it for us.

    I feel strongly that silence, unwillingness to speak up, and
    complacency to the systemic nature of injustice contributes to the problem, so I
    am holding myself accountable to speak up more, even when I feel uncomfortable
    in so doing. As a white person, the fact that I can choose to talk about race
    or choose to ignore it is in itself a privilege; black people don’t get to choose to opt out. As a result, I am choosing to see my privilege, and not to opt out.
    This is not white versus black, cops versus protesters. This is seeing each other, hearing each other, and recognition that “colorblind” does not equal equality; it actually is erasure of lived experience. Let us be honest, let us see the beauty and the pain in each of our stories, and let us use it as a catalyst to do the heavy lifting required.

    I applaud the MN Lynx as well as the doctor’s courage (see Bob’s post in the comments) to speak openly & honestly about these complex topics. Rather than denying any one persons experience, let us listen more. Thank you for the post.

    If any white commenters or readers are confused about the discussion of race in America or are unclear on their part in the struggle faced by people of color, I urge you to read this piece & ask yourself how it relates to you. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_57831e2ae4b05b4c02fd02b8

    • Patricia Allende De Jung

      thank you for this post. you make some very insightful points and offer us an example of what we as white people can and should be doing to help.

  • Dan

    Also
    http://espn.go.com/wnba/story/_/id/17021713/lynx-players-not-wearing-black-lives-shirts-texas

    Lynx spokeswoman Ashley Carlson said the players would not be wearing the BLM clothing in San Antonio.

    “The Lynx organization was made aware about the concerns of the off duty Minneapolis police officers,” the team said. “While our players message mourned the loss of life due to last week’s shootings, we respect the right of those individual officers to express their own beliefs in their own way. … We continue to urge a constructive discussion about the issues raised by these tragedies.”

    • Curmudge

      Wise decision to dump the jerseys. We do love our Lynx.

      • Dan

        While the ESPN headline is “Lynx ditch protest shirts after police walkout”, I’m not sure they were planning on wearing them again anyway…

        • Curmudge

          No, but it’s a darn good bet they would have worn them again.

  • jod tan

    do these ignoramus know who Philando Castile was? go check his background before you cry over his demise. BLM needs to have a brain that can think fairly it is not only blacks lives but all lives matter and more so PLMM Police Lives Matter More than thugs. BLM is racist.

    • crystals

      Jesus take the wheel.

    • Jeff

      I thought Philando Castile only had very minor violations…maybe you know something we don’t know but it’d be nice if you’d back your opinion up with something other than accusations.

  • Curmudge

    This just occurred to me upon reading a post below, but does the contrast between BlackLivesMatter piously supporting dead cops and throwing large chunks of concrete upon the heads of live cops seem bizarre in its profoundly contradictory nature?

  • Jerry

    Seriously, is Powerline down or something? Is that why all the racists are here?

    • The racists are here because we’re talking about race and the biggest problem with race in America is racism and racists.

      Whenever people who are black want to talk about what it’s like being black in America, a lot of white people want to say, ‘Oh, no, that’s not what it’s like at all” and don’t for a second see the problem with that.

  • As it is my happy hour and I don’t wish to work through the night, I’m closing comments until tomorrow morning.