Welcome to the job search (5×8 – 5/28/13)

Why education won’t pay the bills, waiting on the Supreme Court, remembering the Y2K bug, the death of Gene Burns, and Gooseberry Falls in 10 seconds.


1) WHEN EDUCATION WON’T PAY THE BILLS

Congratulations on your graduation from college, kids. Prepare for a long job search.

How far can a good education take you? Not that far, Jeff Madrick wrote in the latest edition of Harper’s. He tells Marketplace that government should be moving in and providing jobs or subsidies. “Their future performance as citizens, as breadwinners, is deeply affected by the kind of jobs they get as young people,” he tells APM’s Marketplace.

“If we only talk only about what this Congress can do, we might as well not talk about anything,” he says.

2) WAITING ON THE SUPREME COURT

Minnesota may have same-sex marriages in August, but same-sex couples won’t have marriages recognized by the federal government unless the Supreme Court strikes down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Maybe we’ll find out today; maybe not.

3) REMEMBER THE Y2K BUG?

From retroreport.org: “The Y2K bug threatened to wipe out computers and disrupt modern society at the end of the 20th century. We all remember the doomsday hype, but what really happened?”

4) RADIO TALK SHOW HOST GENE BURNS DIES

A radio giant has died. The intelligent, warm presence of Gene Burns kept San Franciscans company on KGO from 1995 to 2011. In his career Burns did stints on stations in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Orlando. From sfgate.com:

Colleagues recalled an intellectual powerhouse with a tremendous wit and grasp of the English language who, nevertheless, was painstakingly respectful to whomever he encountered.

“If someone was homeless, he would treat them with the same amount of respect as he would the president of the United States,” said Pat Thurston, a KGO show host and friend of Mr. Burns’.

Born on Dec. 3, 1940, he was raised in Hornell, N.Y., in a family of six children. He began his career in radio in 1962 at WWHG in his hometown, the start of a broadcast career that would last five decades.

In 2002, Talkers Magazine ranked Mr. Burns No. 24 on its list of “The 25 Greatest Radio Talk Show Hosts of All Time.”

Mr. Burns was laid off from KGO in late 2011 along with three other prominent talk show hosts when the station changed formats to focus more on news.

5) GOOSEBERRY FALLS IN 10 SECONDS

Gooseberry Falls Lower Falls Time Lapse – 130524 from Ryan Siemers on Vimeo.

TODAY’S QUESTIONIs it time to scrap lifetime alimony payments in divorce cases?

WHAT WE’RE DOING

Daily Circuit (9-12 p.m.) – First hour: Cities across the country are trying to find ways to stop the sale and use of dangerous synthetic drugs. But as laws are enacted to ban compounds, producers change formulas to keep products on the market.

Second hour: How much money would you need to be happy? Some people think they can name the figure. But a recent article suggests that the link between money and happiness is a myth.

Third hour: At the World Science Festival, eyes and ears turn toward the insect world for a once-in-a-teenage-lifetime event.

MPR News Presents (12-1 pm): A debate from the Intelligence Squared US series. The Food and Drug Administration regulates drugs and medical devices for safety and effectiveness. Is the long and costly approval process stifling innovation and keeping life-changing treatments off the market? When it comes to public health, is it ever okay to sacrifice safety for speed?

Talk of the Nation (1-2 p.m.) – TBA

All Things Considered (3-6:30 p.m.) – TBA

  • BJ

    3) REMEMBER THE Y2K BUG?

    4 digit year dates where a bigger problem than most people understand, but your VCR and hospital hardware where never a problem. Interest and age calculations where a problem, billing and commerce type issues. I don’t know what would be date driven for air traffic, but can’t understand what (besides ticket sales) would cause any issues (safety).

  • chris

    1) WHEN EDUCATION WON’T PAY THE BILLS

    Now out of school and having been in the workforce as an engineer for a year, I’m re-examining my decisions about college in general. Engineering wasn’t what I truly WANTED to do, but I succumbed, probably like many young people, to the fear of not having enough money. That was my single criterion pretty much for selecting a 4 (turned into a master’s though . .) degree. Now that I’m working, I’m finding that money doesn’t make me happy. It’s definitely a catch 22 and I don’t know if I’d be happier, say with the music degree I wanted but unemployed or under-employed, or my engineering job that I’m under-enthused about. Our system makes young people, whom are grossly confused about everything around them and most importantly themselves, make a decision about their working career at the most vulnerable point in their life.

    Sorry recent grads, it doesn’t get any easier.

  • Hillary

    BJ – it’s been a while, but I worked on Y2K fixes in high school. I spent a summer driving around the region upgrading BIOSs on various PCs for clients. Pretty much all embedded circuitry (like avionics, implantable devices, and traffic controls) have dates embedded in the BIOS, and those dates resetting unexpectedly *could* cause problems. We all know they didn’t, but it was a strong possibility. Anything in the user interface is relatively easy to patch, much more so now that almost everything talks to the internet. The next similar issue is going to come up in 2038 (look for Year 2038 problem on wikipedia). The scale we now use for computers was barely imaginable in the 60s.