Love Yemeni style

A court in Yemen has annulled the marriage of an 8 year old girl to a 20-something man after she filed for divorce.

Says the BBC:

The girl told the court she had signed the marriage contract two-and-a-half months ago on the understanding she would stay in her parents’ house until she was 18.

“But a week after signing, my mother and father forced me to go and live with him.”

Her former husband, Faez Ali Thameur, told the court the marriage was consummated, but he denied Nojoud’s claims that he beat her. It is understood that one person attending the hearing has decided to repay Faez the dowry he gave the Nojoud’s father before marriage.

Her father, Mohammad Ali Al-Ahdal told the court he felt obliged to marry off his daughter after receiving repeated threats from the would-be husband and his entourage.

He said was frightened because his oldest daughter had been kidnapped several years earlier and had been forced to marry her abductor.

Weird? Possibly. But who are we to judge what’s weird and what’s not in matters of Mr. or Mrs. Right?

  • Esme Louder

    I am not at all convinced that US kids in the mainstream are all that much safer or better off than those kids. God forbid, kids who has been in the child protection system surely fare the worst….

  • Elizabeth T.

    Engaging in any sort of sexual, intimate behavior with an 8-year-old is morally abhorrent. I am completely unambiguous about that.

    Using the mormon sect in Texas as the comparison, though …

    I am not convinced that polygamy is inherently evil. However, anything can be taken to an extreme. One wife, ok. Two wives, maybe okay. Three wives? How are you ever going to be able to provide adequately for them all in an emotional, financial, and social manner? Really, having one spouse is incredibly demanding, if you are serious about it.

    Children today grow up in non-traditional households. What’s the difference between “bio-mom + bio-dad + step-mom” and “bio-dad + bio-mom + other-mom”?

    Looking in our American mirror, however, at what age does it become morally wrong? Society in the wide-range America can’t even agree on what constitutes an age of consent. 16? 17? 18? There is no fixed, one-size-fits-all age.

  • Jamie

    Weird? Possibly. But who are we to judge what’s weird and what’s not in matters of Mr. or Mrs. Right?

    How can you even say that, Bob?!?! It is simply WRONG WRONG WRONG!! And unfortunately, it happens all too often around the world, so it’s not even exactly weird. Whether a girl is 8 or 18, she shouldn’t be forced into a marriage that her parents deem appropriate for whatever reason! You can bet if that was the situation for a SON of that Yemini man, he would have fought the other family or moved away or something.

    But to say “who are we to judge…?” — especially about an 8-year-old: That makes me really worried about you, Bob. I suppose you would say that about female genital mutilation, too, because it’s also a cultural norm in some places.

  • Jamie

    …not convinced that polygamy is inherently evil. However, anything can be taken to an extreme. One wife, ok. Two wives, maybe okay…

    I think Polygamy itself is not necessarily wrong. I’ve known people who have been involved with more than one person at a time. If they’re honest about it, it CAN be ok, but I’ve never seen it last for very long. It appears that there are usually power differentials that are not healthy and that often make the relationships implode. I have known two female threesomes that have been pretty successful, but they seem to work VERY hard at the relationships.

    But the FLDS are a CULT, plain and simple. Their worst “sin” isn’t polygamy itself, but the brainwashing from birth and the forced marriages of girls as young as 12. This group is all about male domination and fulfilling male sex fantasies.

  • Jamie

    It’s interesting — no it’s disgusting — that the Yemini “husband” of the 8-year-old seemed to think it was acceptable to admit that he had had sex with her, but wouldn’t admit that he had beat her.

  • Bob Collins

    The comment was made to point out that while we often define weird in other cultures, we generally are less quick when it’s our own. It’s a nuance thing.

    One person’s religion is another person’s cult.