Moisture totals adding up; second storm to clip southeast Minnesota

Moisture is beginning to add up this month. Unfortunately it is falling on snow-covered and frozen landscape. Rainfall of 1.20 inches in Mankato resulted flooding and the temporary closure of Highway 169 southbound lane on Saturday.

Sioux Falls, S.D., received a record 0.68 inches of precipitation for March 9. Meanwhile, Eau Clairie, Wis., tallied close to an inch of moisture (0.98 inches).

Precipitation stayed mostly a cold rain in St. Cloud, where they picked up three-quarters of an inch of precipitation on Saturday.

Snowfall totals were generous as well. More than 6 inches fell at Millerville, Minn., in Douglas County. Other snowfall totals gathered by the Duluth NWS Office are listed below:

INCHES LOCATION ST COUNTY TIME

—— ———————– — ————– ——-

9.00 LEADER MN CASS 0547 PM

7.00 5 N PILLAGER MN CASS 0901 PM

7.00 BIGFORK MN ITASCA 0441 PM

7.00 DIXON LAKE MN ITASCA 0908 AM

7.00 SQUAW LAKE MN ITASCA 0834 AM

6.50 3 N BRAINERD MN CROW WING 0921 PM

6.50 KABETOGAMA MN ST. LOUIS 0517 PM

6.30 6 W TWO HARBORS MN ST. LOUIS 0716 PM

6.10 DULUTH HEIGHTS MN ST. LOUIS 0739 PM

6.00 5 NW DULUTH MN ST. LOUIS 0926 PM

6.00 10 N ESKO MN ST. LOUIS 0711 PM

6.00 CLOQUET MN CARLTON 0513 PM

5.80 COLERAINE MN ITASCA 0845 PM

5.60 NASHWAUK MN ITASCA 0905 PM

5.60 7 NW TWO HARBORS MN LAKE 0800 PM

5.30 ALBORN MN ST. LOUIS 0640 PM

5.00 4 S SAWYER MN CARLTON 0825 PM

5.00 7 SE GRAND RAPIDS MN ITASCA 0811 PM

5.00 TWO HARBORS MN LAKE 0749 PM

5.00 LAKE NICHOLS MN ST. LOUIS 0716 PM

5.00 MCGREGOR MN AITKIN 0657 PM

5.00 10 NW SAND POINT LAKE MN ST. LOUIS 0347 PM

More snowfall reports from the Duluth Office of less than 5 inches:

4.80 3 NE NISSWA MN CROW WING 0408 PM

4.50 12 N GRAND RAPIDS MN ITASCA 0850 PM

4.00 FORT RIPLEY MN CROW WING 0735 PM

4.00 LUTSEN MN COOK 0723 PM

4.00 4 NNE DULUTH MN ST. LOUIS 0500 PM

4.00 BRAINERD MN CROW WING 0453 PM

4.00 EMILY MN CROW WING 0256 PM

3.60 CHISHOLM MN ST. LOUIS 0645 PM

3.00 3 E ORR MN ST. LOUIS 1200 PM

2.80 INTERNATIONAL FALLS MN KOOCHICHING 0602 PM

2.30 HOLYOKE MN CARLTON 0842 PM

2.00 MOOSE LAKE MN CARLTON 0849 PM

2.00 LITTLE MARAIS MN LAKE 0551 PM

1.20 7 SE SUPERIOR WI DOUGLAS 0749 PM

1.00 SOLON SPRINGS WI DOUGLAS 1000 AM

Another precipitation-producing weather system is organizing in Missouri and will deliver a heavy, wet snow to Iowa, southeast Minnesota and western Wisconsin in the next 24 hours:

irsatellite.jpg

IR satellite image from 6 a.m. CDT. Coldest cloud tops are depicted in enhanced color.

Source:NOAA/NWS

Graphical presentation from the NWS Chanhassen Office highlights the wintry weather that will play out today and tonight:

nationalmap2.gif

The LaCrosse, Wis., NWS meteorologists paint this forecast of snow accumulation in the next 24 hours:

regionalmap.png

arxgarphic.png

Track the progress of the snow storm from the LaCrosse NWS Office here.

There is some consistency in the model runs to confine the accumulating snow to the southeast corner of Minnesota. This is likely to be a wet snow with a 10-to-1 snow-to-water ratio.

gfs006z.gif

Source:NOAA/Collge of Dupage

GFS model precipitaiton prediction for six hour period ending at 1 a.m. CDT Monday. A band of 6 to 8 inches is laid out from Des Moines to Black River Falls, Wis.

Regional radar at 710 a.m. CDT Sunday:

2xradara3_tribune.gif

Travel with caution today, especially heading south through Iowa and tonight heading toward LaCrosse.

Craig Edwards

  • Scott Henry

    Hey Paul,

    The winds seem to be swinging from NW to NE like a spinning compass this afternoon which brings me to my question. Over the years, you have mentioned Boyle’s Law of thermodynamic fluidity when determining the direction a low pressure center is located by using the wind at your back and extending your left(?) hand to point at the center of the low. I do this on a regular basis during the winter months as lows and highs are more predictable and slow moving as opposed to spring and summer where more convection comes into play.

    I am totally fascinated with the concept of this practice however I ask for some clarification. I read (in the Northern Hemisphere) one must rotate 30 degrees to the right to take into account the Coriloes Effect.

    Can you please explain how to locate the center of a low with your back to the wind?

    I absolutely love your work on air and online Paul!

    Scott

  • Craig

    Basic flow of wind and pressure patterns in the northern hemisphere validate that when the wind is at your back, low pressure is centered to your left.

    Since the low pressure movement is dynamic and winds have some variability, there is no need to try and shift your body 30 degrees.

    Old school meteorology maintains that increasing winds from the northeast and east with a falling barometer raise the probability of precipitation.

    Winds shifting from the east to the north combined with a rising barometer lead to improving weather conditions.

    Craig