Tempering the heat, adding more clouds and thunderstorms

Anyone feel like celebrating the heat and humidity that set a record in the Twin Cities on the 4th of July? The maximum temperature of 101 at the Twin Cities International Airport on Wednesday beat the old record of 100 set in 1949. Dew points in the 70s lifted heat index readings to near 110 degrees. We also set a record high minimum temperature of 81 degrees on the 4th. Surpassing the old record of 80 set in 1999.

A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET YESTERDAY IN ST CLOUD MINNESOTA…

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 97 DEGREES YESTERDAY IN ST CLOUD.

THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 96 SET JULY 4 1988.

.A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET YESTERDAY IN EAU CLAIRE WISCONSIN…

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 98 DEGREES YESTERDAY IN EAU CLAIRE.

THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 97 SET JULY 4 1999.

Bouts of thunderstorms moved through northern and central Minnesota yesterday and overnight. At daybreak this IR satellite image depicts the coldest cloud tops and the location of thunderstorms.

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Source: NOAA

A weak frontal boundary has settled over central Minnesota this morning. This division in air masses is expected to remain nearly stationary today and this evening. Meanwhile a mid level trough (an inducer of thunderstorms) will approach the upper Midwest tonight. Chances for showers and thunderstorms are at least in the 50/50 range for the next 36 hours for much of central and southern Minnesota.

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Forecast weather for July 5, 2012. Source: NOAA

This afternoon temperatures will be several degrees lower than Wednesday’s maximum temperatures. Readings of 100 degrees were recorded at St. Paul, Winona, Red Wing and Black River Falls, Wisconsin. It was a relatively comfortable 79 at Baudette on Wednesday afternoon. Thunderstorms prompted warnings of large hail and strong winds during the afternoon and nighttime hours.

Storm report from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center for Wednesday.

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This computer image from the Rapid Update Cycle forecast model depicts the temperatures expected later this afternoon.

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Temperature forecast for 4 p.m. CDT from RUC. Source: NOAA and College of Dupage

Thunderstorms should favor some places with rather generous rainfall the next 36 to 48 hours.

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NOAA experts paint this graphic of rainfall potential ending at 7 a.m. CDT on Saturday. Some storms today and tonight may produce large hail.

Seasonal temperatures are seen statewide for Saturday and Sunday accompanied with lower dew points. In the meantime, southern Minnesota will experience two more days with readings in the lower to middle 90s.

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Forecast temperatures for Sunday at 7 p.m. CDT

Source: NOAA GFS and Twisterdata.com

Have you noticed the earlire sunsets? Probably not! But the daylight is getting shorter.

Craig Edwards

  • bsimon

    What I find interesting about this streak of broken records is that each successive record was seemingly set in a different year. How unusual is it to have a heat wave not only this hot, but this long in duration?

  • Craig

    Dr. Seeley will likely have some answers about this period of heat on Friday’s Morning Edition.

    Not surprised to see heat extend a couple days as we approach the climatological warmest days of the year.

    1988 was particularly hot. Our grandparents can tell us about the heat in the 1930s, particularly 1936. A number of weather records for heat are still on the books from the 1930s.

    Successive days of 100 degrees and higher are quite rare in the Twin Cities.