What is a bigger problem in Washington, lack of compromise or a lack of principles?

“According to a new poll from Monmouth University, 68 percent of Democrats say the problem with Washington is that there isn’t enough compromise. An additional 25 percent say it’s politicians who aren’t principled enough,” reports the Washington Post.

On the GOP side, it’s the opposite. Their voters say 54 percent to 36 percent that the problem is too few principled pols.

Today’s Question: What is a bigger problem in Washington, lack of compromise or a lack of principles?

  • Gary F

    Democrats only want compromise when it benefits them. And many Republicans “went along to get along” or faced the threat of being demonized by the left leaning mainstream media. Now with the growth of the internet, talk radio, cable/satellite TV, and decline of the daily local newspaper, the decline of the NY Times/Time/Newsweek/USNews, and the decline of the CBS/NBC/ABC nightly news, the Republicans can actually have a spine for a change and it bothers the left leaning media, as shown in this post.

    • Ralphy

      Of those still in the race, whose leadership style do you think would be the most effective POTUS at moving their agenda in the next cycle? Why?
      In your time, who do you think had been the most effective POTUS? Why?

  • PaulJ

    It seems these are being set up as diametrically opposed, can’t there be a “both and”? That is to say the problem is stubborn rogues.

  • Pearly

    Biggest problem in Washington is lifers

  • lindblomeagles

    Answer: (c) None of the above. Look, the only reason Washington has predominantly stalled since 2010 had NOTHING to do with principles or compromise. Angry (often bigoted) Republican voters refused to honor President Obama’s 2008 victory, and purposely elected white (mostly House, but some Senators too) politicians that also would not honor Obama’s 2008 election. Truth be told, Republican voters are ECSTATIC their Congressional majority isn’t working with Obama, and they are wholly invested in electing a politician who they feel will uphold less inclusive beliefs, specifically as it relates to America’s growing racial diversity. That’s why Donald Trump is doing real well. Donald Trump, if you’ll recall, was one of the individuals who REFUSED to honor Obama’s win, suggesting over and over and over again that Obama was a foreign citizen (Muslim), even though the President clearly was none of that. He’s made offensive remarks about Hispanics, and he’s not open to having more Central Asian (deemed Middle Eastern) refugees coming here. For many Republican voters, this election is about “turning the clock back.”

    • elkriverscott

      I’m on the floor! Ha ha ha ha ha. This is gooood stuff. Seriously, you had me going for a minute there. The thinking you are mocking is fortunately on the way out. The “They hate black people” act is done. Put a fork in it. This is 2016, hippies not allowed. The race card is for desperate losers of society.
      Unfortunately the democrats need to be defeated, not compromised with. The immoral debt at 8 trillion is now 18. Leaving this massive debt for the future is going to make us look like really really greedy leeches stealing from the future. Your race crap sickens me.

      • Sue de Nim

        I actually don’t observe a lot of liberals “playing the race card.” What I notice way more often is haters of liberals playing the “playing the race card” card as a way of shutting down reasoned debate.

        • Pearly

          What would you conceder to be “a lot”?

        • Gary F

          Liberals almost always play the race card when their argument is weak.

          • Sue de Nim

            It’s conservatives who almost always play the “playing the race card” card when they’d rather not talk about race.

          • elkriverscott

            Facts are racist. Pointing our the insanity of the black violence culture is reality.

          • kevins

            Right…well at least you said “almost”.

      • PaulJ

        The race to the bottom is being led by republicans who rely on their constituent’s misunderstanding, of the dynamics of power, to allow the leaders to pull up the ladder behind themselves. That’s THE race card and we’re getting played.

      • Ghoster

        I think you’re right. Things like a living wage, paid sick leave, and investment in infrastructure are all silly things. I’m so glad the Republicans have the moral courage and principles to oppose them. And it’s good to know that there was no racial animus in Mitch McConnells 2009 comment that the primary goal of the Repubs was to make sure Obama would be a one-term President.

        • elkriverscott

          You like power to force your ideas. Pity.

      • Rich in Duluth

        This comment sounds like it was made by a troll and offers nothing of value to the conversation. However, it is a clear example of the kind of thinking that is going on in Washington and throughout the country. There are genuine problems in this country, but the kind of thinking displayed in the comment: distracting with insults, using hyperbole, devaluing compromise, and ignoring other people’s reality, is a large part of the thought process that keeps Washington so dysfunctional and unable to solve problems.

  • Sue de Nim

    It’s both. The goal of finding workable compromises used to be an honored principle in Washington. The reason some folks in Congress are being unreasonably “principled” these days is not so much because they believe in those principles (because if they did, they’d be willing to make progress toward their aims by means of compromise), but because being intransigent is how they pander to their bases and win primaries in their safe-for-the-party districts. What passes for principle in Washington today is pure machiavellian political calculus.

  • Ghoster

    The Repubs have voted 60 times to repeal Obamacare. The issue isn’t lack of principles, it’s intransigence.

    • Khatti

      One man’s intransigence is another man’s standing on principle. Now, let’s move on to the next question: in the future should we settle our political disputes on the field of honor?

  • Khatti

    Perhaps the solution is that people as well-intentioned as us should not only get to vote in Minnesota’s congressional elections; we should get to vote in Mississippi’s as well.