Who should decide what’s acceptable clothing for high school students?

A Minnetonka high school principal has attracted attention for asking parents to enforce dress codes for their daughters. In particular, he wants girls to stop wearing tight, spandex leggings that reveal too much. Today’s Questions: Who should decide what’s acceptable clothing for high school students?

  • linda

    I am a big supporter of school uniforms. Our granddaughter goes to a public middle school where uniforms are worn. No arguments over what to wear. The kids look great. It saves a boat load of money and nobody feels bad about their clothes. The kids don’t like it much but our argument to them is you can have more money for regular outfits. Also kids will change out of the uniform immediately upon getting home from school. Win for everyone.

  • GregX

    The school & district should establish a uniform.

    My daughters attended a school where they provided a list of what types of pants, shirts w/logo, vests, sweaters w/logo, shoes were approved and a list of what was NOT approved. In addition they specified colors that were permitted.

    Arrangements were made with a couple of local retailers where families could get the “logo-ed” clothes simply by calling with sizes. Families could also shop for themselves at that store or on their own for the non-logo stuff. The school ran a swap where families could put good quality used uniforms-clothes for others to re-use.

    The kids loved it … they focussed on the person. the teachers liked it – it was nice to eliminate one factor fo the peer-pressure game. The admin liked it – because everyone looked like they were a team – and pretty much seemed to behave that way.

    Come to think of it … we should do this at some places I worked.

  • jockomo feena nay (the original)

    I agree, school uniforms.This would allow the little monsters to focus on learning instead of who’s pants are sagging down to their knees.

  • Bob

    Totally agree with Linda in comment # 1. When students are in school everyone benefits when their focus is not on what others are wearing. I’d wager with anyone that test scores would improve. Win/win as Linda says.

  • Philip

    Our state and nation have chosen to discard decency. The leggings aren’t the real problem. Romans 1:18-28.

  • Jim G

    I’m of two minds on this question.

    My former teenage self would like the teenage girls to make this decision.

    But as a retired educator, I’d agree with the Minnetonka principal that parents should talk to their kids about dress styles and the image they want to present to the greater society. Then I’d ask the bus drivers to turn down their heaters and the janitors to reset thermostats in the classrooms. Of course, this will be done to conserve heating fuel and reduce the district’s capital expenses.

  • JasonB

    One part of me says the parents, another part says that there should be a minimal standard set by the schools. In the end I’m not sure, but I don’t see it as a big problem.

    Those black-and-white educational films from the ’50s said that “dungarees” were unacceptable. In the ’70s I remember it was halters and tube tops. So today it’s leggings. Unless something is clearly getting out of control I wouldn’t worry about it. Kids will be kids, and their questionable dress today will be replaced with something else tomorrow.

  • Ann

    Don’t you have to wonder if people really care about these issues? The media is having a heyday with the Petraeus situation. They don’t even mention that Clinton did the same thing when he was Commander in Chief. He said that it was none of our business–that he had only failed his family, not us.Clinton seems to be more popular than ever.Who knows how many women there were besides Monica?The media has also quoted statistics for years that say that a high percentage of people have affairs at work. People laugh at those of us with traditional values. This is naturally going to affect all areas of life.

  • t

    It’s up to families to figure this out. Kids are going to make ill advised fashion choices. Kids are going to be distracted. A principals fixation on leggings isn’t ultimately going to change much.

    Let’s stop being so puritanical and maybe it wouldn’t be such an issue. If kids see a boundary like this they are just going to push it, over and over and over. Bodies are just bodies.

    I get the appeal of uniforms, but ultimately I think we want to promote individualism and creativity, not stifle it. We want schools to be a place to explore, not churn out robots. This isn’t really about clothes, it’s about how you imagine education.

    I graduated high school about 10 years ago at the top of my class, having a perfectly miserable experience. I went to a college that promoted individualism, creativity and rigor where I thrived. Motivate kids by making school motivating, not by trying to address every little possible distraction, because it won’t work. Teenagers are brilliant at creating distractions.

  • kim

    Jim G had a great answer.

    I’d have to add that, if this is the biggest issue on the agenda, life is good. It seems like this kind of thing provides a great teachable moment. Somehow, people have to learn about how other people perceive things like attire, and how people can be judged (right or wrong) as a result. Kids need to learn that they have value beyond their appearance and they don’t always learn this kind of thing at home.

  • Gary Krull

    Teens need direction. Their antics beg for it. Parents too busy to be involved. Skirts for the girls, ties for the boys, and neatly trimmed hair with no facial hair. This makes every one equal. After they graduate, then they can make decisions otherwise.

  • Andrew

    Either Hugh Hefner or Alfred E. Neuman.

  • Mica

    I was born male, but I like to wear skirts and kilts a couple times a week. Wondering if and when my school would frown upon it. Maybe they think it’s only a stage since I’m only 16. Peeps don’t mind, teachers just smile. Maybe we’ve just got a cool school.

  • Tyler

    American Apparel.

  • John

    It should be our socialist society who decides every movement of every individual because most are terrorist or deniers.

  • Rani

    Who should decide? ohh a bunch of old shame based fuddy duddies.

    Just kidding, Jim G had a good answer

  • Tyler

    ….and the student body, with reasonable fashion suggestions from wise and fabulous counsel considered.

  • steven P.

    WE should have a vote on this hot topic, especially so we avoid the real important stories in our government.

    her is some new voting info that NPR will not cover because it makes the liberals tricks look bad to the rest of the world.

    The Washington Post (no friend of Col. West) reported today: Col.Allen West (R) -Patrick Murphy (D) race: Florida to probe vote issues.

    The Post reports, “After a partial recount of early voting in the county (St. Lucie), Colonel West gained 132 votes and challenger Murphy lost 667.” wow, liberal’s voter fraud finally is worse than we have in Minnesota!

  • Jefferson

    I agree this topic would barely make it into the Minnetonka High School paper, now it’s a daily discussion point for MPR? What about those job numbers? Looks like the unemployment rate will go up for this month…how convenient that the unemployment rate dropped below 8% for the last 2 job reports before the election. Right after the election the unemployment rate will most likely jump back up above 8%.

    Funny how I wrote the editor of MPR and mentioned that the massive drop in unemployment was from an unreliable household survey where 800,000 jobs were created and didn’t match up with the actual jobs created from employers of 114,000…yet that difference was never mentioned when analyzing the job numbers (from MPR and NPR). I even told the MPR editor that I’d hate to see that unemployment rate go back above 8% in the next job report or the one after the election…now it looks like that’s going to happen. I just find it quite convenient that the unemployment rate make that dip right before the election when the 8% number was a big point of contention from both campaigns. I also find it quite telling that the controversy behind the numbers and surveys was suddenly ignored within days of the reports appearing.

    Yet here we are discussing “acceptable clothing for high school students”, good work MPR!

  • Linda in Plymouth

    The earlier comment says it best and explains why MPR and NPR donations have dropped.

    ” Funny how I wrote the editor of MPR and mentioned that the massive drop in unemployment was from an unreliable household survey where 800,000 jobs were created and didn’t match up with the actual jobs created from employers of 114,000…yet that difference was never mentioned when analyzing the job numbers (from MPR and NPR). I even told the MPR editor that I’d hate to see that unemployment rate go back above 8% in the next job report or the one after the election…now it looks like that’s going to happen. I just find it quite convenient that the unemployment rate make that dip right before the election when the 8% number was a big point of contention from both campaigns. I also find it quite telling that the controversy behind the numbers and surveys was suddenly ignored within days of the reports appearing.

    Yet here we are discussing “acceptable clothing for high school students”, good work MPR!”

    Thank you for your post! Far left reporters will never handle the real stories in depth..and now MPR thinks we are all low functioning or college educated idiots that don’t know who Rice is, or even Hillary for that matter. For example: The other day I asked a clerk, she said, “who is Benghazi? some singer?”

  • Jefferson

    I know this probably isn’t the venue to discuss this but does anyone else find the Art Hounds segments painful to listen to? It’s like they find people who think they are funny, insightful and artistic when in reality they’re awkward, annoying and pretentious…it’s never useful and it always makes me turn the station. Just my 2 cents.

  • kevins

    I remember when Beatle Boots were forbidden, and none of us could wear short pants to school because of the rules. Long hair was controversial, and no girls wore pants. There were leering principals and petulant teens then, and now. I graduated from high school and happily left all of that. This is just the 2010′s version of the same issue, never resolved, and having nothing to do with Obama, Libs, Bengazi, Rice, and on and on. Sad that some haven’t let high school go.(Although listening today, it may reflect Senator McCain’s view, grabbing desperately onto the past). Har!

  • Wally

    Abercrombie and Fitch, of course.

    Seriously, salacious retailers like A&B are part of the problem. Parents should set the standard, but as many parents have abdicated that responsibility, don’t care, are idiots, or clueless fools, or are trying to dress like teens themselves . . . and girls’ clothing leaves little to the imagination, and boys have their pants halfway to the knees, schools should set standards.

    I remember the time wasted deciding what to wear in school. Uniforms would have spared that.

  • Nina

    The ancient Greeks and Vikings. Or Madonna.

  • Julie Sonnek

    I am with the pro school uniform folks!

  • JAS

    Some type of school uniform should be used in all public schools because constantly addressing inappropriate clothing issues is waste of time for teachers when all of their energy should be spent on student learning.

  • Steve

    Re. Mug shot sites. If you are found not guilty, ALL of those sites will pull your mugshot on receiving proof.