Should the Olympics’ opening ceremony include a moment of silence in honor of those killed at Munich 40 years ago?

Voices from around the world and within the U.S. government have urged the International Olympic Committee to observe a moment of silence in honor of the Israeli athletes slain at the Munich Olympics in 1972. The IOC says it will honor the 11 Israelis in other ways. Today’s Question: Should the Olympics’ opening ceremony include a moment of silence in honor of those killed at Munich 40 years ago?

  • John

    No, I think there should be a moment of silence for the 1.5 million Palestinians killed by Israel since 1948 when Israel came into existence. Also a moment for the US service personnel on the USS Liberty which was attacked in international waters by Israeli forces on June 8, 1967, killing 34 Americans and wounding another 174.

  • Steve the Cynic

    If there were a moment of silence for every atrocity ever committed, the world would be very quiet for a long time.

  • todd

    I agree that there should not be a moment of silence, but for me it is because I think the Olympics tries very hard to present itself as apolitical. However shameful and horrible the Munich killings were, they were born out of political strife. Any official remembrance would only inflame the passions of the political division that still exists. It wouldn’t match with the Olympic concept that we can all be united by our humanity.

  • Mary

    The Olympic Committee has the right to plan the ceremonies as they see fit. they have their own agenda. As for me, I still haven’t forgiven them for omitting Minnesota in the torch relay of 2000.

  • Jim G

    No, to a moment of silence to commemorate death and destruction.Yes, to a moment of silence for the gift of these short lives and talents which wilt so quickly in the summer sun. Yes to life. No to death.

  • GregX

    sure… it make a good commercial for coke later on. ok ok , maybe pek-si. cheese-burgah, cheese-burgah, cheese-burgah – NO CHIPS.

  • Lily

    I don’t have an opinion one way or another about whether there should be a moment of silence, but people like John and Steve the Cynic, and to some extent todd, are missing the point. This is not about having a moment of silence for Israel as opposed to Palestine, as John is insinuating, nor is it a moment of silence for an arbitrary atrocity committed, as Steve the Cynic implies. And the purpose of the moment of silence has nothing to do with the external political situation that created the background for the killings, as todd suggests. It has everything to do with the fact that *Olympic* athletes were murdered while they at the *Olympic Games*. It’s about remembering Olympians who were killed while participating in this event. The fact that they were Israeli, and that the motives for their killings were political, is completely beside the point, and frankly irrelevent.

  • Paul

    Mourning during a celebration can look shallow.

  • Bear

    Well said Lily.

  • Steve the Cynic

    No matter how apolitical the official reason might be for such a thing, Lily, it would be politicized.

  • Kurt

    I second the “thanks” to Lily for an eminently sensible comment.