How will a larger, older and more diverse population affect life in the Twin Cities?

The Twin Cities population is expected to grow larger, older and more diverse over the next three decades. A new report from the Metropolitan Council forecasts growth of nearly 900,000 residents and a population that is more than 40 percent people of color. Today’s Question: How will a larger, older and more diverse population affect life in the Twin Cities?

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  • Richard

    By 2020, Minnesota will have about the same number of people over age 65 as it will have school-age kids. In terms of limited state dollars, that means the need for senior services is going to compete with education funding.

    Another challenge is to streamline the costs of caring for the aging population — for example, to restructure long-term care.

  • Erica

    My mother came up with an interesting solution: she now refers to my brother and me as her “retirement accounts.” Her argument is that she’s largely financed our lives and educations until adulthood, and in the future she’s entitled to a bedroom in each of our (hypothetical) houses. And a golf cart. We’re still not certain how serious this plan is.

  • Steve the Cynic

    Does that mean we’re catching up with Florida?

  • Philip

    Hopefully having an older population will bring a calming effect to the masses. Well, I can hope for it…better get my newspaper now.

  • Gary F

    “By 2020, Minnesota will have about the same number of people over age 65 as it will have school-age kids. In terms of limited state dollars, that means the need for senior services is going to compete with education funding.”

    Right on.

    Or another way to put it, less people to pay taxes, more people wanting more government.

    With an aging population, seniors will choose senior spending over education dollars when forced to choose between the two.

    The insatiable beast called government will never be satisfied.

  • GregX

    Multi-generational homes – (everywhere). Increased inner city density and growth of neighborhood economies for services. Increased demand for ( and use of) mass transit. First Ring suburbs will experience dramitically rising pressure for social services – but conservaitve policies that they support now will have curtailed their availability. Second Ring suburbs will see an increase in apartment complexes and townhomes – not for seniors, but for families that can’t afford traditional housing. This will foster big-box retail expansion, higher demand for childrens services, and mass transit connection to central city and their quadrant partners. …..

  • Steve the Cynic

    “Or another way to put it, less people to pay taxes, more people wanting more government.”

    And one solution to that problem is more immigration, so there will be more people to pay taxes.

  • Jim G

    I predict:

    An older more diverse population will consume fewer products than today’s younger more monolithic population, so look for our current consumer driven economy to soften.

    Just as seniors spend their limited resources prudently, they will also vote for politicians who will support domestic spending programs that educate their grandchildren and punish those who try and mislead and reduce our current Medicare to stipend programs that will never keep up with rising health costs.

    Older voters usually are less willing vote for those who support foreign interventions. Hopefully, that means fewer military deaths and casualties.

    We will have more diversity in state government. That’s why today’s Republicans are trying to lock constitutional amendments into place that will only benefit Republican donors and mitigate this change in voter demographics.

    Older guys don’t care as much about professional sports, so look for the most violent ones like hockey, boxing, and ultimate fighting to disappear from TV. The activities that keep you fit: i.e. bicycling, hiking, and fitness centers will likely grow. Look for professional golf to gain popularity. It’s an easy program to watch while taking an afternoon snooze.

    The snoozing is a sure thing…

  • Gordon near Two Harbors

    Why would anyone want another 900,000 people living in the Twin Cities? What happens in the 20 years after that?

    It’s time to radically reduce immigration rates and import only those who are skilled enough to function in the most advanced country in the world.

    The more people we have, the less freedom and opportunity we get.

  • georges

    Roe v. Wade was a godsend.

    It came at just the right time.

    We may not be able to pinpoint the EXACT moment our economy would have colapsed under the burden of 600 million with 80% forming an outlier majority.

    But, in general terms, we do know it would have been in the late 1990s.

  • Ann

    Time magazine recently printed a map showing the number of hours that people spend commuting in various cities. The Twiin Cities had a high number of commuting hours compared with other cities.Sometimes it seems that one doesn’t have many options because only certain roads go over the rivers. I would use mass transit, but I know that many Twin Citians love their cars.I hope that there will be employers who will employ more workers in their 40’s and 50’s. There will be a lot of us in poverty in a few years if they don’t. Diversity has advantages, but how much immigration should be allowed when there aren’t jobs? Minnesota has a lot of jobs in the health care industry, but not everyone can do that. Can’t the legislators do things to attract business? Time magazine had graphs that showed that we are one of the most highly taxed states in income, corporate, property, and sales taxes.