Does party endorsement help you evaluate candidates for governor?

Minnesota’s major political parties will endorse candidates for governor in state conventions this weekend and next. Today’s Question: Does party endorsement help you evaluate candidates for governor?

  • Steve

    no

  • Michelle

    No, not really. They don’t always pick the right person.

  • bsimon

    No. The parties seem to reward insiders who are talented at party politics rather than leaders who will run the state well.

  • Steven

    The best governor we’ve had since I moved to Minnesota, Arne Carlson, did not have his party’s endorsement. So, no.

  • http://SpiritualAnimal.com Brett Engle

    It never did matter to me and it especially doesn’t now. We don’t need either of these two corporate sponsored parties to control our government anymore! We need new leadership that isn’t tied to any existing pool of power or money. Whatever your political leaning, it’s time to seriously seek out and consider independent and third party candidates.

  • Steven

    I’ve usually evaluated them long before endorsement.

    I’ll always vote for the endorsed candidate even if they weren’t my first choice, as I respect the causcus system.

    If none is endorsed I’m free to choose in the primary.

    If, in the primary, an unendorsed candidate (the “pri-mate”) defeats an endorsed candidate, I’ll vote against them. Humphrey ran & beat Freeman, & I voted Jesse.

    Switch from caucus to primary if you want to run without the grassroots effort.

    Take note Gaertner, Dayton, et.al …

  • Stephanie

    No, I am looking for a candidate who cares more about serving the people of Minnesota than serving his political party. The best candidate will be a consensus builder who is able to cross party lines to get things done.

  • Pat

    It does, but not in they way they would like. The parties tend to endorse extreme candidates, or someone who has “paid their dues” and it’s “their turn.” I’m more middle of the road, and the party endorsement tells me who NOT to vote for.

  • David

    No. Our electoral process is in shambles. It’s extremely difficult to really get a picture of the candidate’s positions and beliefs amidst all of the political razzle-dazzle. I seek out websites like ontheissues.org that spell out what a candidate has said and done in the past, and what the promises they have made. I don’t necessarily care that a politician “feels my pain.” I want to know what they intend to do about it.

  • Lawrence

    That’s a great question. For me, some candidates do appeal to me more than the one the parties endorse. For example, I respect and like Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak and Margaret Kelliher, but Thissen seems to discuss issues that are important to me. And when I say discuss, I mean, he seems more interested in trying to find solutions to problems that don’t jeopardize any groups that make Minnesota home. However, if Thissen doesn’t win party endorsement, I’m still like to vote for Rybak and Kelliher because I do respect some of the things these two candidates stand for.

  • Cat

    No. What the party decides is good for the party is not necessarily what is best for the state, in my view. I think this year the parties need to be very careful who they choose to go to the wall for, and instead look through the eyes of an electorate that is less invested in any particular party, rather perceiving the parties as significant obstructionists to getting the people’s business done.

  • Scott

    NO!

  • CC&H

    “The best governor we’ve had since I moved to Minnesota, Arne Carlson, did not have his party’s endorsement. So, no.”

    EXACTLY! Thanks, Steven!

  • http://minnesota.publicradio.org/publicinsightjournalism/ comments sent to MPR

    Comments texted to MPR:

    I vote for whoever says “gubernatorial” the most during debates. -Matt, Woodbury

    Endorsement: MAYBE. -Tess, Mpls

    Party endorsement doesn’t influence me because I research and evaluate candidates based on my own wants/needs not party lines. -Kathleen

    Absolutely yes. I vote straight ticket. -Bradley Sidle, Minneapolis

    Yes and no. I wish we had more varied definitions of political leanings beside a and b, but it is a helpful starting point as i begin to make my decisions for voting. -Stephanie, Minneapolis

  • Tony

    I always vote against the GOP because I feel they’ve made themselves into the greater of two evils.

  • Craig

    “The best governor we’ve had since I moved to Minnesota, Arne Carlson, did not have his party’s endorsement. So, no.”

    I also agree with Steven. Arne was more interested in management than strict ideology.

  • http://www.linkedin/in/aaronneumann Aaron Neumann

    Absolutely

  • http://www.linkedin/in/aaronneumann Aaron Neumann

    Absolutely. It helps separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak. Together, delegates choose the best possible person to run in the primary and beyond. Since delegates range from far right, moderate, to far left, depending on the party, it becomes a long and tedious process and many people get to shape the final outcome. The candidates get “put through the paces”, as Barack Obama coined it in his run for endorsement, and the best possible advocate for a political party often emerges.

  • Aaron

    Absolutely. It helps separate the wheat from the chaff, so to speak. Together, delegates choose the best possible person to run in the primary and beyond. Since delegates range from far right, moderate, to far left, depending on the party, it becomes a long and tedious process and many people get to shape the final outcome. The candidates get “put through the paces”, as Barack Obama coined it in his run for endorsement, and the best possible advocate for a political party often emerges.

  • Steve

    A bigger question for me: Why does Minnesota have both a caucus and a primary? It’s redundant.