How seriously do you take the threat of H1N1 flu?

Health officials are urging people to take precautions because of a likely outbreak of H1N1 flu this fall. The precautions include such common-sense strategies as handwashing and covering your mouth when you cough. How seriously do you take the threat of H1N1 flu?

I didn’t take H1N1 very seriously, until this week when i got the flu. I’ve been miserable in bed for 3 days now. This bug will kick your butt. -Keith H., Minneapolis, MN

With three small children one with asthma I have to take h1n1 very seriously. -Jennifer

H1N1 shows how small we are to even the tiniest virus. We are quickly put in our place. -Jann

I don’t take swine flu seriously because its not in Minnesota. If it was i would take it very seriously. -Kellen Roeske, Blaine, MN

  • anon

    zero. its the sky is falling. a waste of time.

  • Drew

    Not very. But maybe I don’t know enough about it. I have family members (including small children) who were diagnosed with H1N1 last spring, and it didn’t seem to be that big of a deal–just a bad cold, really. I have a feeling that I may have even contracted it around that time as well, but I didn’t bother to go to the doctor to verify that it was H1N1 because I didn’t feel it was necessary. Seems to me, most of the people who are being hospitalized have underlying health issues, much like the seasonal flu. My question is: what are the statistics on the ratio of hospitalizations for the H1N1 flu compared to the ratio of hospitalizations for the seasonal flu? I think that statistic will determine how concerned I should be.

  • Shawn

    Not very seriously because I think most people are over reacting. (I think Ameriacans are good at that.) Yet, I don’t think we should ignore normal flu precautions like washing our hands, covering your mouth when you cough, and taking a day off to rest if you are sick.

  • Paul

    I thought they already have vaccinef or that badboy. Making the only threat that from news people with nothing else to talk about.

  • Moriah

    I take it very seriously. We have no idea how virulent this thing may be, and if we are not fully prepared, those who are complaining about overreaction will be demanding answers about why we were not prepared. The bottom line is we are working with the unknown and in this case it is better to hope for the best but prepare for the worst.

  • Bob

    Dose Typhoid Mary ring a bell?

    The H1N1 flu in combination with the concerns over the heath care debit is a dangerous combination. It can take only one person to infect many with H1N1 flu. In addition, if that one-person dose seek medical attention because of the lack time, insurance or has a high deductible individual policy; many innocent people can be infected with the flu. Let us pray that American government can take care of its people and prevent a wide spread H1N1 flu outbreak.

  • Benjamin Peterson

    It’s easy to be irrationally fearful because this flu is “new” and “strange” to us. You’re still far more likely to die driving in your car or of heart diease.

  • Luke

    it is completely ridiculous to be scared of a flu that has been around and known about for 20+ years. But give it a clever name and all the sudden it is breaking news? People who are at a high risk, such as elderly and children, should be vaccinated if they choose to. But for the remainder of the population, I don’t think its a risk at all.

    Comments on comments-

    “Dose Typhoid Mary ring a bell?” Typhoid Mary had nothing to do with a flu, that dealt with cleanliness and poo. Wash your hands, don’t go to work if you are sick, don’t eat your poo, etc and you will be fine.

  • Alex

    I’m not too worried, but its not something to ignore.

    “it is completely ridiculous to be scared of a flu that has been around and known about for 20+ years. But give it a clever name and all the sudden it is breaking news? People who are at a high risk, such as elderly and children, should be vaccinated if they choose to. But for the remainder of the population, I don’t think its a risk at all.”

    This flu was just discovered this spring, how can you say its been known for 20+ years?

    You have to remember this form of the flu is brand new.

  • Edward Lagace

    I have never taken flue vaccine. I believe we take medicine to far.

    There has to be a natural ability to let the body build its immunity.

    If this dose not take place our world will not continue to support homo sapiens.

  • Lynda

    Any flu can be dangerous. Thousands die every year from the flu. But we need to balance that with some common sense – exercise, eat well, wash your hands, stay away from infected people and get on with life. There is no point in being panicky or paranoid.

  • lindsey

    Personally, I am terrified of contracting any type of flu. Even though I have refused to get a flu shot for the past 4 years, I am still very afraid. The main problem for me is that I work at the airport and am concerned with how the operations on a daily basis will change during flu season. I am curious as to how they will train us to detect passengers with the flu and the type of reactions the public may have to being denied boarding.

    I really don’t want to get sick, so I will definately be toting around my giant liter bottle of hand sanitizer. Blech — we all hate being sick!

  • JohnFx

    The media needs to sell ads and newspapers.

    Creating hysteria over a “super-flu” despite the fact that it is far less fatal and widespread than regular old flu seems to be their way of doing this lately.