Art Hounds: Aida, Jesters Comedy Improv, and contemporary Native American art

Dyani-Master's Study.jpg

“Master’s Study” by Dyani White Hawk (courtesy of the Tweed Museum of Art)

The hounds start the new year by spreading the word about a Minneapolis theater company interpreting a Disney musical, a Duluth exhibition that places traditional American Indian art and culture in a modern context, and a Mexican restaurant in Roseville that’s become a weekend hangout for improv comedy.

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lauriepapehadley.jpgLaurie Pape Hadley is expecting a visionary interpretation of the Disney musical “Aida” from Theater Latte Da. “Aida” hits the Pantages Theater stage beginning Thursday, Jan. 3 in preview performances. Laurie works as an ‘audio describer,’ describing the visual elements of performances for visually impaired people.

For Huge Theater co-founder Jill Bernard, living the dream is spending a Saturday night at Ol’ Mexico restaurant in Roseville drinking margaritas, eating quesadillas and watching Jesters Comedy Improv! The improv troupe takes over the back room of Ol’ Mexico every Saturday night at 7:30.

peter spooner.JPGThe Tweed Museum has asked five contemporary American Indian artists to respond to pieces from the Tweed’s extensive, highly respected Native American art collection. The exhibition is called “Encoded: Traditional Patterns/a Contemporary Response.” The result, according to Duluth independent curator and arts educator Peter Spooner, is a provocative conversation about the links between past and present native culture. The show will be up through March 17.

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  • http://www.blogspot.com/tawardrope T.A. Wardrope

    Many of us are disappointed that Jill Bernard choose to denigrate “going into the city” in her endorsement of Jester’s Comedy Improv. I’ve never been to Jester’s, but I am sure it is every bit as fun as she says it is.

    However, given that the majority of independent artists and art organizations are located in the Twin Cities, why does she need to echo a prejudice that is so widely held outside of the cities? For my family and I, a location outside of the cities is a major detriment to arts and entertainment, as it limits transit and other options.