We Art Minnesota: The Bracket Park Rocket

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Welcome to the first installment of an occasional series here on State of the Arts we’re calling “We Art Minnesota.” We’ve been asking Minnesotans to share their favorite works of art that belong to the state, and why. People can submit images of themselves with their favorite work of art, or put together a short video if they like (preferably under a minute in length). It can be a piece of public art, something in a Minnesota museum, or even a building you think is particularly lovely. Use your imagination! Once we get enough submissions, we’ll look at putting together a map of the state, covered with links to your favorite art. Voila – State of the Arts!

Today’s submission comes from Ed Linder. Ed writes:

This piece of art is really close to me for lots of reasons. 1) it’s located about a block from my house and 2) I helped get this piece of art created.

About 7 years ago the Rocket was part of the playground equipment located in Bracket Park. It was one of the last Rockets in the Minneapolis area. They were going to get rid of the Rocket to make way for new and improved playground equipment. My son Theo, at the time was 5 years old and was really up set that the Rocket was going to be destroyed. I thought if there was a way to save the rocket it would make a lot of kids and people in the community happy because of the wonderful memories the Rocket brought to them.

I looked in to what was being done and there was a local group doing just that, “saving the rocket.” The group was called Brackett Rocket Boosters. I helped raise money to save the rocket and I was on the committee to help choose the artist who would make the rocket into a piece of art. That is my favorite art piece in Minnesota.

Ed also sent along some links(thanks Ed! We love links!). You can find out more information about the Bracket Park Rocket here and about artist Randy Walker here.

Interested in submitting your own video or photo of your favorite art in Minnesota? We’d love to hear from you.

  • http://InTheLoopShow.net Jeff Horwich

    Why did they retire the rockets? Is it because they look like basically child head-injury machines?

  • Marianne Combs

    You got it. According to the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board: “The Rocket was partially closed in the late 1990s because it no longer met safety standards. In 2004 it was removed as part of park renovation.”