Hennepin Co. worried about street closures near new Vikings stadium

Developers are apparently thinking about closing Park and Portland avenues, which bracket the StarTribune property.

The Strib’s Rochelle Olson is reporting out of a Hennepin County board meeting that the commissioners aren’t looking too kindly on the prospect that development near the new Vikings stadium might close Portland and Park Avenues.

The Star Tribune has reported it is in real estate talks that could lead to the redevelopment of some or all of its property to the west of the new stadium site.

County commissioners frowned on the idea of closing the streets, which are also county roads. They provide access to some critical county facilities, like the Hennepin County Medical Center and the Hennepin County Medical Examiner building. They also bring in state road aid, the Strib reports.

Here’s the map:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=downtown+minneapolis&hl=en&ll=44.974774,-93.260032&spn=0.005123,0.011362&sll=44.974389,-93.260054&sspn=0.005123,0.011362&t=w&gl=us&hnear=Minneapolis,+Hennepin,+Minnesota&z=17

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  • JQP

    for the purposes of pure scientific research – sure.
    for any other fantastical “benefit to society” like a herd of them, no.

  • JQP

    for the purposes of pure scientific research – sure.
    for any other fantastical “benefit to society” like a herd of them, no.

  • kraig

    At least one so we can make mammoth burgers!

    Really it would be a good source for tissue samples for making vats of mea! Mmm, baby back mammoth ribs!!

    • Gary F

      Ribs like they get a the drive in on the Flintstones!
      t
      OK, so you make one, or a couple, where do you put them? It’s not like getting a stray cat. What do you feed it? What is it’s temperament? Cleaning up the poop from that thing, yikes.

      Maybe it went extinct for a reason?

    • Wally

      I can see it now: the “McMammoth.”

  • kraig

    At least one so we can make mammoth burgers!

    Really it would be a good source for tissue samples for making vats of mea! Mmm, baby back mammoth ribs!!

    • Gary F

      Ribs like they get a the drive in on the Flintstones!
      t
      OK, so you make one, or a couple, where do you put them? It’s not like getting a stray cat. What do you feed it? What is it’s temperament? Cleaning up the poop from that thing, yikes.

      Maybe it went extinct for a reason?

    • Wally

      I can see it now: the “McMammoth.”

  • Steve the Cynic

    “Should”? Like, it’s a moral question? Scientific curiosity is a good enough reason to do it. I’m trying to imagine some good reason why anyone would object, and I’m coming up empty. I suppose the wife of a workaholic scientist might complain, “You’re spending more time with her than with me!” A market fundamentalist might say, “The government shouldn’t do it; if it’s worth doing, the private sector will find a way to make a profit with it and make it happen.” An eco-zealot might see something “unnatural” about about it. But really, why not?

    • http://mntoday.mprnews.org/ Michael Olson – MPR News

      Some are making the case that it is a waste of scientific resources.

      Scientist Daniel Fisher tells Kate Wong at Scientific American, “I have more confidence in our ability to generate new knowledge from the fossil record than in our ability to learn from cloned mammoths.”

      • Steve the Cynic

        That would be sour grapes from a jealous rival, don’t you think?

      • Jeff

        Any scientist that says they can understand more about a living creature by studying its bones rather than observing it first hand is not telling the truth. It’s fine to be against cloning for moral reasons or if you think it will be taken too far but the scientific data gathered from a living animal vs its bones is simply not up for debate. Ask any scientist if they would rather study an animal itself or only its bones…99.9% of them would rather have the animal to study.

    • Hey Der

      I thought that was the lesson relayed by Jeff Goldblum’s character near the end of Jurassic Park – or maybe I have it confused with another movie, but somewhere, somebody said – the scientists were so worried about the question “Could we?” that they didn’t stop to consider the question “Should we?”

  • Steve the Cynic

    “Should”? Like, it’s a moral question? Scientific curiosity is a good enough reason to do it. I’m trying to imagine some good reason why anyone would object, and I’m coming up empty. I suppose the wife of a workaholic scientist might complain, “You’re spending more time with her than with me!” A market fundamentalist might say, “The government shouldn’t do it; if it’s worth doing, the private sector will find a way to make a profit with it and make it happen.” An eco-zealot might see something “unnatural” about about it. But really, why not?

    • http://mntoday.mprnews.org/ Michael Olson – MPR News

      Some are making the case that it is a waste of scientific resources.

      Scientist Daniel Fisher tells Kate Wong at Scientific American, “I have more confidence in our ability to generate new knowledge from the fossil record than in our ability to learn from cloned mammoths.”

      • Gary F

        Question of the day should have been on Jim Graves or the IRS scandal

        • david

          If you want a question to satisfy your political ax you wish to grind, how about one about how david koch threatened pbs to stop contributing when they were about to air a documentary critical about him?

          • Gary F

            Sure, lets talk about that. Better than a wooly mammoth/snufalufagus story

      • Steve the Cynic

        That would be sour grapes from a jealous rival, don’t you think?

      • Jeff

        Any scientist that says they can understand more about a living creature by studying its bones rather than observing it first hand is not telling the truth. It’s fine to be against cloning for moral reasons or if you think it will be taken too far but the scientific data gathered from a living animal vs its bones is simply not up for debate. Ask any scientist if they would rather study an animal itself or only its bones…99.9% of them would rather have the animal to study.

    • Hey Der

      I thought that was the lesson relayed by Jeff Goldblum’s character near the end of Jurassic Park – or maybe I have it confused with another movie, but somewhere, somebody said – the scientists were so worried about the question “Could we?” that they didn’t stop to consider the question “Should we?”

  • Jeff

    I think cloning a wooly mammoth would be a great idea. Showing the public a creature that hasn’t existed for tens of thousands of years would do a great deal to get kids and adults interested in biology and science in general. Look at the Jurassic Park movie, just the thought and imagery of cloning extinct animals captured the attention of a generation and dramatically increased interest in dinosaurs…imagine what actually seeing a real wooly mammoth at your local zoo would do to get the greater public interested in science?

  • Jeff

    I think cloning a wooly mammoth would be a great idea. Showing the public a creature that hasn’t existed for tens of thousands of years would do a great deal to get kids and adults interested in biology and science in general. Look at the Jurassic Park movie, just the thought and imagery of cloning extinct animals captured the attention of a generation and dramatically increased interest in dinosaurs…imagine what actually seeing a real wooly mammoth at your local zoo would do to get the greater public interested in science?

  • Em

    Who clones it, who funds it and will they own it, who is responsible for its health and habitat, do we clone another to be its mate, where do we draw the line? Do we clone more animals if we find blood in another extinct animal? It’s not something we should be near-sighted on.

  • Em

    Who clones it, who funds it and will they own it, who is responsible for its health and habitat, do we clone another to be its mate, where do we draw the line? Do we clone more animals if we find blood in another extinct animal? It’s not something we should be near-sighted on.

  • Wally

    Sure, because after we waste TRILLION$ trying to stop global warming, and instead, get another Ice Age, it will be good to have a pachyderm adapted to the cold.

  • Wally

    Sure, because after we waste TRILLION$ trying to stop global warming, and instead, get another Ice Age, it will be good to have a pachyderm adapted to the cold.

  • david

    Yes, even though my first impression is that it may be very difficult to keep alive. I don’t know enough about cloning to know if the beast will have any sort it immune system to deal with today’s bugs. I imagine it has a very strict climate it can survive in, and that’s why its no longer around. But what we could learn on just those two fronts makes it potentially worth the effort.

  • david

    Yes, even though my first impression is that it may be very difficult to keep alive. I don’t know enough about cloning to know if the beast will have any sort it immune system to deal with today’s bugs. I imagine it has a very strict climate it can survive in, and that’s why its no longer around. But what we could learn on just those two fronts makes it potentially worth the effort.

  • kevins

    Lots of good questions below about the implications of re-establishing the beast on earth, but I find the possibility of actually experiencing an animal that is extinct to be fascinating. This is especially true because in my estimation, we will be losing some current inhabitants, including some that I rather enjoy (polar bears, non toxic walleye etc.). I wish I could get one of my German Shepard Dogs back, but it wouldn’t hurt my feelings at all if wood ticks went away.

  • kevins

    Lots of good questions below about the implications of re-establishing the beast on earth, but I find the possibility of actually experiencing an animal that is extinct to be fascinating. This is especially true because in my estimation, we will be losing some current inhabitants, including some that I rather enjoy (polar bears, non toxic walleye etc.). I wish I could get one of my German Shepard Dogs back, but it wouldn’t hurt my feelings at all if wood ticks went away.

  • Pearly

    If it happens great, if not well….

  • Pearly

    If it happens great, if not well….

  • Gary F

    How about genetically altered cows developed to make them fart less to stop “global warming”?

  • Gary F

    How about genetically altered cows developed to make them fart less to stop “global warming”?

  • Jim G

    We might be able to do it, but I don’t think we should. Although we could probably focus on some interesting scientific knowledge; for example it wouldn’t hurt to linger on the fact that climate change caused this species and many other large mammals to go extinct. But one thing I know about wooly mammoths is that they lived in family groups, as elephants do today. I wouldn’t want “Wooly” to grow up without a mom teaching him all the important things that little mammoths need to know. Like Rule #1: Stay away from those two-legged wolves with the pointy sticks.

    • Steve the Cynic

      We don’t know for a fact that climate change caused the mammoth’s extinction, any more than we know for a fact that over hunting caused it, but the circumstantial evidence favors the latter explanation. Their kind (along with giant sloths and other such things) survived several cycles of ice ages and thaws. It was only with the proliferation of modern humans in northern climes that they died out.

  • Jim G

    We might be able to do it, but I don’t think we should. Although we could probably focus on some interesting scientific knowledge; for example it wouldn’t hurt to linger on the fact that climate change caused this species and many other large mammals to go extinct. But one thing I know about wooly mammoths is that they lived in family groups, as elephants do today. I wouldn’t want “Wooly” to grow up without a mom teaching him all the important things that little mammoths need to know. Like Rule #1: Stay away from those two-legged wolves with the pointy sticks.

    • Steve the Cynic

      We don’t know for a fact that climate change caused the mammoth’s extinction, any more than we know for a fact that over hunting caused it, but the circumstantial evidence favors the latter explanation. Their kind (along with giant sloths and other such things) survived several cycles of ice ages and thaws. It was only with the proliferation of modern humans in northern climes that they died out.

  • Paul

    Let the poor thing rest in peace if you can’t think of a good reason to do it. And don’t give me that fundamental research excuse, this sound more like they are try Fun-da-mental research.

  • Paul

    Let the poor thing rest in peace if you can’t think of a good reason to do it. And don’t give me that fundamental research excuse, this sound more like they are try Fun-da-mental research.