A troubling trend for electronic pull tabs

I asked the Minnesota Gambling Control Board for the updated daily figures for electronic pull tabs, and they gave me the sales data through the end of the year. Players in Minnesota bet about $4.1 million through the end of 2012, according to the data. But there’s some troubling aspects to the games hidden in the numbers. For instance, the per-day gross fell to about $180 for the life of the games. That’s far, far short of the $225 a day experts were projecting.

And it gets worse. Here’s the DAILY PER-MACHINE GROSS, expressed as a weekly average, since the games started September 18th, according to data obtained by MPR from the Minnesota Gambling Control Board:

pulltab-chart1

 

The weekly average for the per-machine gross has hit as low as $110 since the games started — less than HALF the initial projections. Minnesota Gambling Control Board executive director Tom Barrett noted that December is typically a low ebb for chartiable gambling in Minnesota, so there is likely some seasonal variation in these numbers. But this is NOT the direction they should be going if electronic pull tabs are going to pay for a Vikings stadium.

Here’s the story that ran on Minnesota Public Radio’s Morning Edition program this morning.

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  • Jim G

    The best and most dedicated people I know are teachers. I learned more than one lesson from my many teachers and it
    would be unfair to choose just one, so here are a few lessons that I still remember today many years after these lessons were first learned. I learned to love orchestral music from Mr. Chlebecek and organ from Mr. Bohm. I learned how to write a coherent paragraph from my 10th grade English teacher, Mr. Anderson. I’m still trying to “keep it up.” I learned how to “hit them harder than they hit you” from my football coach Mr. Roy. I learned that the Holocaust is always with us from Mr. Gerard, but that Germans are people too from Mr. Russell, my German language teacher. That math does add up to a successful life from Algebra teacher, Mrs. Maw. I learned that we are all a part of the web of life on Mother Earth. That we are poisoning and despoiling our web and that we are in the middle of the 6th great extinction…caused by us from college professor, Mr. Putz. One more lesson I’m still learning is that the universe is a mystery worth exploring from the late Professor of Astronomy, Karlis Kaufmanis, University of Minnesota.

  • Lance

    Lessons that still repeat in my head while driving – 30 years later:

    - Aim High in Steering

    - Get the Big Picture

    - Leave Yourself an Out

    thanks Mr. Cooper!!

  • Sue de Nim

    Focus on the road, not the bumps in it.

  • Chad

    “If you listen long enough, you’ll hear everything you need to know.” -3rd grade teacher

  • Wally

    How revealing that this teacher spouts the same edupap about the “achievement gap” that all the educrats do, to try and suck more money out of the taxpayers.

    She knows who butters her bread.

    Oh yeah: I learned a love of words from a senior English teacher. Who wasn’t an educrat.

  • shyestviolet

    From the U’s fantastic Donna McAlpine, a true teacher and mentor: “Not everyone gets a trophy for participating.” You have to put in your time and effort to make it in today’s job market. It’s something my generation needs to hear a bit more, as we were raised in an environment of “everyone wins.” We’re not entitled to a successful career (in whatever form “success” takes for you)–we have to earn it.

  • Al

    From JoAnn Michna and Mary Grau-Stumpf, respectively, both of Hill-Murray School:

    There is no excuse for shoddy work, and be compassionate in everything you do.

  • Ann M

    I have to add that most of my teachers were not great teachers. I studied and practiced because I wanted to learn.The bad teachers who just gave you a magazine to read and didn’t even try to teach had the greatest effect because they discouraged one from learning.So I learned much more in a poor school that didn’t have tenured union teachers.

  • Jim G

    Your experience, if true, is sad. All of the teachers I mentioned today were teachers first but also members of unions. There is no cause and effect relationship as you seem to imply between union membership and the disinterested “baby sitting” you describe. I’ve found unions to be tools to enable individuals who are powerless by themselves to effect fair work rule changes. Workers form unions because they are badly served, underpaid, abused, or exploited by management. If teachers/workers were treated fairly and generously there would be no reason to form them.