Notes in the Margins: Portugal’s hazing, America’s worries and Michigan’s free-college idea

Student Deaths Spark Debate Over Hazing at Portugal’s Universities Where academic achievement has often failed to create distinction, hazing, known as praxes in Portuguese, has taken on a new and prominent place at the country’s newer private universities, with some having their identity closely tied to the ritual. (The New York Times)

A different way to give college admissions tests Every 12 years, the president of the College Board announces important new changes that will better align the SAT to high school curricula and promote reading and writing.  Yet the test still fails, and these changes are unlikely to help it pass. (The Washington Post)

How Do Americans Feel About College? The Princeton Review Asked. Americans get really worried about college. (Washington Monthly)

Quarter of UC population had bad experiences on campus, survey finds Officials say they’re pleased that about 73% of undergraduates reported feeling ‘comfortable’ or ‘very comfortable,’ but express concern about reports of discrimination and isolation. (Los Angeles Times)

Pay it forward: Plan would allow Michigan students to attend college for ‘free’ In return for free tuition, students would have to agree to pay a fixed percentage of their future income for a specified number of years to a special fund that would pay other students’ college bills. (Detroit Free Press via University Business)