Notes in the Margins: Derailed presidents, politician presidents and default rates

Former GWU president Trachtenberg on why university presidencies are derailed Being at odds with an ambitious governor is just one way for a university president to get ousted. A newly mentioned book illustrates others: ethical lapses, poor interpersonal skills, governing-board troubles, inability to lead key constituencies and — an obvious one — failure to meet institutional objectives. (The Washington Post)

Will Holding Colleges Accountable for Default Rates be Effective? I’m skeptical because I don’t see many colleges actually facing sanctions, nor do I see the fines being particularly effective. This is one of those ideas that is great in theory, but may not work as well in practice. (Washington Monthly)

Chinese lead student exchange figures in the U.S. Some of the most popular majors among international students are business management, engineering and physics. (USA Today)

Higher Education Is Now Ground Zero For Disruption Why? US Higher Ed has a product that does not work, ridiculous costs, and an antiquated business model. (Forbes via NAICU)

Universities hire politician presidents The moves might seem unlikely next steps for prominent politicians. But college presidents aren’t just expected to deal with budgets and faculty members. They advocate to Congress and state lawmakers and execute billion-dollar fundraising goals — and politicians used to the era of soft money are a natural fit for coaxing donations from alumni and wealthy supporters. (Politico)

  • Guest

    Politicians, regulators, and an outcry from the public has led to any ideas that will help students from predatory for-profit colleges and the huge debt with no jobs to pay it back. Atty Gen from 33 states are cracking down heavily (MN being one of them). These schools are money machines who seem to care very little about education or the actual student success they advertise so heavily about (see GU/MSB latest heavy marketing push despite lost and ongoing lawsuits and predatory lending articles talk about). I think MN has finally had enough and I’m not sure why MPR has dropped reporting on these items, it’s so important for the public to know.