Notes in the Margins: Cheating, online issues and the NFL

The Trouble With Online College Student attrition rates — around 90 percent for some huge online courses — appear to be a problem even in small-scale online courses when compared with traditional face-to-face classes. And courses delivered solely online may be fine for highly skilled, highly motivated people, but they are inappropriate for struggling students who make up a significant portion of college enrollment and who need close contact with instructors to succeed. (The New York Times)

Major competition in your major The competition formerly reserved for entry-level jobs has made its way onto the college campus. (USA Today)

It Takes a B.A. to Find a Job as a File Clerk The college degree is becoming the new high school diploma: the new minimum requirement, albeit an expensive one, for getting even the lowest-level job. (The New York Times)

Web Classes Grapple With Stopping Cheats Traditional colleges and a new breed of online-education providers are pouring resources into efforts to solve a problem that has bedeviled teachers for centuries. (The Wall Street Journal)

College Enrollment Lessons From the NFL The NFL protects the game by limiting teams’ off-field competition. Should colleges do the same? (U.S. News & World Report)