Notes in the Margins: Amenities, endowments and digital rights

Colleges Likely To Gain Applicants By Spending More On Amenities Than Academics Although American universities are often criticized for spending large amounts of money on elaborate residence halls, recreation centers and other amenities, the results of new research suggest this might be exactly what college-bound high school seniors want. (The Huffington Post)

Rights protection proposed for digital learners The “Bill of Rights and Principles for Learning in the Digital Age” outlines fundamental rights that students should be able to demand from universities, colleges and companies that offer online courses. They include a right to privacy, to own one’s own intellectual property and to financial transparency. (Times Higher Education)

New Law Schools Open Amid Lawyer Glut A handful of U.S. colleges and universities are opening up new law schools, hoping to fill their classrooms despite steep declines in the number of law students enrolling nationwide and fierce competition for law jobs. (The Wall Street Journal)

Feds eye campus bank card deals The college business is a lucrative one, and it has attracted the attention of the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. (Star Tribune)

Study Confirms Drop in College Endowment Returns Investment returns on college and university endowments declined by an average of 0.3 percent last year, down from 19.2 percent in fiscal 2011, according to a new study. (The New York  Times)