Minnesota's new accountability scores


Here are the results of Minnesota’s new school-accountability measurements, which replace the ones used by No Child Left Behind.

The new system gives each school two big scores.

1) The main score: the Multiple Measurements Rating.

It uses the Adequate Yearly Progress score to measure student proficiency. AYP is based largely on standardized test scores in reading and math. But the new score also takes into account graduation rates and performance growth in students. And it considers how well a school is closing the achievement gap between middle-class whites and minority, low-income and special-needs students.

2) The Focus Rating.

This concentrates on the performance of minority, low-income and special-needs students in each school.

A school’s score is the percentage of total possible points that it earned in all the assessed areas. The list of statewide school scores also shows high and low performers.

Those schools on federal assistance that score in the top 15 percent are called Reward Schools. Close to 130 Minnesota schools fall in that category.

The bottom 5 percent, or just over 40 schools, on federal assistance are Priority Schools.

Eighty-five schools are known as Focus Schools. They are the bottom 10 percent in closing the achievement gap between white, middle-class students and their peers.