Notes in the Margins: College consultants, student ambassadors and getting hitched

Report: UC pepper spraying could have been prevented The report concludes that UC Davis police failed to use standard procedures in planning for the protest, and recommends a top-to-bottom overhaul of the entire UC police force. (San Francisco Chronicle via University Business)

Applicants Should Trust College Student ‘Ambassadors’ Less, Experts Say Applicants may not realize how carefully colleges orchestrate and censor many of their interactions with current students both on campus and online, admissions experts say. (U.S. News & World Report)

The Choice Blog: A New Tool to Compare Financial Aid Offers The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has introduced a tool to help students make apples-to-apples comparisons of their financial aid offers. (The New York Times)

College Consultants: Worth the Price Tag? More parents are turning to professional consultants to help their children get into their top picks by providing help with everything from standardized testing to best practices for interviews. Prices for college consultants range from $250 to $40,000, and experts say their services are becoming more in demand as school guidance counselors become overburdened. (Fox Business via NAICU)

College-Educated Women And Marriage: No Longer Risk Being “Old Maids” According to a New York University study, college-educated women are now as likely to get married as their less-educated peers — even if the weddings happen in a somewhat older age range. These findings contradict the prevailing idea that women who pursued higher education were more likely to delay finding a mate while studying and building demanding careers. (Slate via The Huffington Post)

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    CFPB’s tool for estimating and comparing tuition costs is very helpful, but when I did a cost comparison for three schools, it became immediately clear that far more important is being able to get some kind of a financial aid.  So in my comparison, the sticker price for MIT ($55,270) was much higher than the one for the average four-year private non-profit university ($42,224).  However, when you subtracted the average grants and scholarships, the average private school overtook MIT by a wide margin ($26,694 vs. $18,644).