Why a winter's morning at St. Olaf is like a vacation

Great morning view

When I arrive at St. Olaf College, it’s 6:30 a.m. and still completely dark. As I head to Stav Dining Hall in Buntrock Commons for breakfast, I look around campus at all the old buildings, all sprinkled with snow.

I feel more like I’ve arrived at a mountain resort and lodge, not a college. Buntrock has an heck of an entrance:

Entering Buntrock

Breakfast is all you can eat for $6.57, and today it’s an elaborate affair: a Belgian waffle station, a station for omelettes made to order, a breakfast burrito station, as well as excellent muffins, yogurt, cereal and so forth.

Worth the wait

It’s quiet when I enter, but the hall soon gets livelier as students pop in. (They’re much too chipper for 7 a.m., though.)

Yes, mom -- pizza for breakfast

The hall’s airy interior and open beams continue the lodge theme — especially lovely on a winter morning. Here’s the view from near my table:

A scene like this aids the digestion

I’ve spied a big fireplace in the student lounge, so I might cozy up next to it later in the day if someone lights it up.

  • Lisa Murakami
  • Lisa Murakami

    LOVE THIS!  Will be linking to it in my own Olaf-is-amazing blog entry:  http://bostonwed-murakami.blogspot.com/2011/09/autumn-memories-saint-olaf-college.html

  • Guest

    You do realize that what you called “an elaborate affair” is normal breakfast at Olaf, right?

  • Guest

    You do realize that what you called “an elaborate affair” is normal breakfast at Olaf, right?

    • Anonymous

      Yes, indeedee. I know your reputation.

    • Anonymous

      Yes, indeedee. I know your reputation.

  • Guest

    Funny story…Those dots of light on the ceiling of the entrance to Buntrock are actually the shapes of constellations. However, the person who constructed it did so from above, so all of the constellations are backwards to the viewer in the entrance–as they’d be seen by “God” rather than from Earth. WIN, St. Olaf.

  • Guest

    Funny story…Those dots of light on the ceiling of the entrance to Buntrock are actually the shapes of constellations. However, the person who constructed it did so from above, so all of the constellations are backwards to the viewer in the entrance–as they’d be seen by “God” rather than from Earth. WIN, St. Olaf.