Notes in Margins: Merit awards, dwindling grads and the 17th century

Admission dean pulls back curtain on merit aid The admission dean at University of Rochester pen an unusually candid list of 12 “steps that mattered” in merit awards at his school this year, and the approximate dollar value of each factor in shaping the merit award. (The Washington Post)

Biddy Martin Wants To Use Tuition Hike For Financial Aid: In one of her final acts as UW-Madison chancellor, Biddy Martin asked the UW Board of Regents if she can set aside money so that low-and-middle income students won’t have to pay a proposed 5.5 percent tuition increase. (Wisconsin State Journal via University Business)

17th century is trendy at New Saint Andrews College Students toss around Latin terms, don black robes and the curriculum is based on Harvard’s — from the 17th century. (USA Today)

Colleges to counteract dwindling ranks of high school graduates An aging population, coupled with a decline in high school graduates entering college and the workforce, is a matter for national concern, experts say. The decline is most pronounced in parts of New England, Ohio, Michigan, North Dakota, Massachusetts and New York. Seeing the writing on the marker board, some area educators are trying to entice other sources of college fodder, including former dropouts. (Kansas City Star via University Business)

Why Colleges Should Help Students Minimize Private Loan Use Colleges can play a significant role when it comes to reducing their students’ reliance on private lenders. The majority of undergraduates who borrow with private loans could have borrowed more in federal loans, putting students and their families at unnecessary — and at times extreme — financial risk (The Huffington Post)