Minnesotans' comments on the cost vs. benefits of college

Early this morning I posted link to MPR’s Question of the Day:

When does a college education no longer seem worth the cost?

I’ve sifted through the responses to bring you just a few:

From Brooke, who sees the question as a fundamental one:

This is the simple question that high school juniors should be taught to ask and find answers to. … Questioning why NOT to go to college has become taboo …

Steve the Cynic says it depends on how one measures “worth the cost”:

I reject the premise that the sole criterion is whether it’s a good financial investment. How much is wisdom worth on the free market? It’s an awfully narrow mind that values things based on how much money the highest bidder will pay.

Chelle joined others in discussing trade school, but said it can also create thinkers:

Two issues here: Is college a trade school offering just a (Return on Investment)? It didn’t used to be. We used to want ‘liberal arts’ education to learn how to question, think, and become a responsible citizen

But, assuming one expects an ROI, then pick a program and a college wisely.

Tony seems to say it’s always worth it — at least as a minimum for a career:

… If I didn’t have a college education there’s a chance I’d live in poverty forever. With a college education that chance is just smaller.

Furguson11 said the price is (usually) worth a foot in the door:

My undergraduate degree and masters got me an interview, otherwise I would not have had a chance at my job (law enforcement then criminal justice policy analysis). … But my son(s) have to deal with an entire different cost to benefit ratio.

And Kevin VC had some grim benchmarks:

… * When the job you were aiming for disappears before you even get to graduate.

* When graduation rates for a 4 year college degree is 8 years.

* When your low cost parking spot is removed for a stadium. …