Notes in the Margins: Guns, cheating and debt-ridden soldiers

GI Bill changes could send some veterans into deep debt For most student vets, recent changes to the GI Bill mean a sizable boost in the money they receive. But for a smaller group, the change will mean a painful cut in funding they thought would be available to pay for classes next year. Veterans groups who had supported the legislation in December are scrambling to find a fix before August, when the new provisions go into effect. (Stars & Stripes)

Internet Cheating Scandal Shakes Japanese Universities At first, the postings on a popular Web site last week seemed innocuous enough: a user soliciting help for answers to a series of difficult math and English questions. But it later became clear that the questions were taken straight from an entrance exam to prestigious Kyoto University. And they were being posted — and receiving answers from other users — while the exam was still underway. (The New York Times)

Women Gaining on Men in M.B.A. Aspirations A study has found that 48 percent of M.B.A.-program hopefuls were women, up from 46 percent last year and 35 percent in 2006. (The International Herald Tribune)

Higher Education Lowers Blood Pressure, New Research Shows Researchers concluded that the effects of education on blood pressure may be higher in females. After adjusting for age, they found that female participants with fewer than 12 years of education had 2.69 mmHg (millimeters of mercury) higher blood pressure than those who’d been in school for at least 17 years. (The Huffington Post)

Lawmakers Debate Effect of Weapons on Campus About a dozen legislatures nationwide, concerned about the potential for campus shootings, are considering arming their academies. Gun control advocates say Texas is probably the most likely to pass such a measure, with Arizona also in the mix. (The New York Times)