Notes in the Margins: Filled-up classes, super students and lawyers without borders

Breaking Media Apart: Textbook Rentals by the Chapter A new UK e-textbook aggregator, Reference Tree, is offering to rent e-textbooks by the chapter. (newsonomics.com)

For-Profit College Report Valid After Changes, U.S. GAO Says A U.S. investigation that found misleading and fraudulent recruiting practices at for-profit colleges is accurate and unbiased, according to the Government Accountability Office, the agency that conducted the probe. (Bloomberg)

Should college students who linger  pay  more? Utah lawmakers are entertaining the notion of requiring students who have enough credits to graduate to pay the full cost of their education — more than triple Utah’s subsidized resident tuition. If colleges and universities charged full tuition for students who hold 120 percent of the credits needed for graduation, they could raise $45 million a year. And it would give some students an incentive to get out of school in a timely fashion. (The Salt Lake Tribune)

After a False Dawn, Anxiety for Illegal Immigrant Students Students who declared their illegal status in a campaign for legislation that failed to pass are now vulnerable. (New York Times)

Lawyers Without Borders: It’s Time to Globalize the J.D. To what extent does globalization make a difference for U.S. law and U.S. law schools? As Andrew Guzman, director of graduate programs at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law candidly comments, “I don’t think that law schools, collectively, have figured out what it is they should be doing. A lot of schools are trying different things with the word ‘international’ in them.”

Left in the Hall Nearly a third of community college students were unable to enroll in one or more classes last semester because they were full, according to a new national survey. (Inside Higher Ed)