Notes in the Margins: TKE returns, academic credit and selling notes

The nerd turns: A cappella singers suddenly the popular kids on campus For decades, a cappella was a tradition that thrived mainly at Ivy League institutions and small liberal arts schools. But a cappella is enjoying an explosion on all manner of campuses. (The Washington Post)

Perfect ACT scores Mounds View High School students Daniel Lee and Stephen Sanny have earned perfect scores on the ACT college entrance exam. Only 24 students across the state scored a perfect 36 on the test this year. (presspubs.com)

TKE fraternity returns to U campus After seven years away, the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity has returned to the University of Minnesota and hopes to obtain a house on UniversityAvenue next year. (mndaily.com)

4 Very Different Futures Are Imagined for Research Libraries Will research entrepreneurs drive the research agenda in 2030? Or will information be ubiquitous and of little value? Librarians consider the possibilities. (chronicle.com)

Academic Credit: Colleges’ Common Currency Has No Set Value It underlies calculations of student progress, faculty workload, government appropriations, and financial aid. But higher-education leaders argue against a strict standard of academic credit. (chronicle.com)

Program in Israel Pays Single Moms to Go to College Free babysitting and free tuition give women an opportunity to get their degrees. (chronicle.com)

Rising hookah use spurs stigma Because smoking hookah is a relatively new activity among college students, one student’s experience reflects the stigma many others have faced when using tobacco pipes, specifically hookahs. (mndaily.com)

Cal State Bans Students From Using Online Note-Selling Service California State University has barred students from buying and selling lecture notes online through a new note-sharing service called NoteUtopia. (chronicle.com)

Ed Begley Jr.: Community Colleges and the Green Economy For decades, community colleges have been the backbone of American workforce training. Because they are nimble and closely attuned to local community needs, they are inherently positioned to be influential leaders of the movement for a sustainable economy. (Huffington Post)