Notes in the Margins: Indian students, scholarships for the rich and useless remedial classes

Location-Based Apps Add Virtual Dimension to Campus Maps Colleges integrate applications such as Foursquare into student life to encourage students to engage with their surroundings. (chronicle.com)

Affluent Indians Sending More Students Abroad Education experts say this increasing affluence, and a shortage of top-quality colleges and universities in India, is likely to send more students abroad. But recruiters say that U.S. colleges and universities are learning that they cannot simply sit back and expect enrollments to grow but must increasingly rely on recruiters. (The New York Times)

International Group Announces Audit of University Rankings At a recent conference for academics and institutions focused on rankings, the organizer unveiled a project that would effectively rank the rankers. (chronicle.com)

College dropouts cost taxpayers billions States appropriated almost $6.2 billion for four-year colleges and universities between 2003 and 2008 to help pay for the education of students who did not return for year two, a report released today says. (USA Today)

In Higher Education, a Focus on Technology A new initiative aims to accelerate the development and use of online learning tools in postsecondary education (feeds.nytimes.com)

Community college students mired in ineffective basic-skills classes The morass of remedial education – some research has shown it’s often ineffective, and students who need it drop out at alarming rates – is one reason President Obama called for the first-ever White House summit on community colleges. (hechingerreport.org)

Should Rich Students Get Merit Scholarships? The vast majority of colleges and universities in this country dispense money to rich kids through merit scholarships or grants. The higher-ed world isn’t proud of this practice, but it’s pervasive. (feedproxy.google.com)