Notes in the Margins: Graduating athletes, retirement cuts and world accessibility rankings

UC President Recommends Cutting Retirement Benefits Former University of Minnesota president — and current UC president — Mark Yudof has released his recommendations for how he wants the University of California to change its employee retirement plan and eliminate a $12.9 billion unfunded liability. (universitybusiness.com)

Athletes Graduating at Record Rate N.C.A.A. athletes are earning degrees at record rates, graduate at higher rates than other students and football players and black men’s basketball players are making gains in the classroom. (feeds.nytimes.com)

What Facebook Tells Researchers About Friendship and Race College freshmen are more likely to make friends with peers they share a dorm room or major with than they are to befriend those from similar racial backgrounds, a study on the Facebook profiles of first-year students found. (chronicle.com)

Report Ranks Nations on Accessibility and Affordability of Higher Education How countries fare in terms of their rankings on the two measures can vary considerably. (chronicle.com)

For the Indentured Educated Class, Suicidal Thoughts are Not Merely an Individual Problem Suicidal thoughts among debtors are at epidemic levels. That’s why we must act now to solve the student lending crisis. If you imagine millions of debtors and co-signers who are contemplating, or have contemplated, suicide, what does that do for the health of a nation? (google.com)

Ivy League Students Single Out Peers Who Don’t Donate Nonprofits have long used the honor roll, a list of benefactors prominently displayed, to inspire others to make gifts. In the last school year, seniors at Dartmouth College and Cornell University turned that tactic on its head, creating a sort of dishonor roll of peers who failed to donate to the class gift. (The New York Times)

Comments on High-Octane Parents, and their Blessedly Decaffeinated Children Readers tell their own stories as a follow-up to “A Father’s Acceptance: His Son Won’t Follow His Ivy Footsteps.” They tell of the divergent, oft-rocky paths taken by parent and child. (thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com)