Notes in the Margins: Drunkorexia, France and Mac's wind turbine

Phone app flaunts campus deals A student-run advertising agency will be launching a beta phone application next week featuring deals and coupons for Dinkytown, Stadium Village and West Bank businesses. (mndaily.com)

Mac’s wind turbine generates more hype than energy It’s a “demonstration turbine,” a “piece of lab equipment,” a “symbol.” But there’s one thing Macalester’s 90-feet wind turbine is not: a major source of energy on campus. (themacweekly.com)

‘Drunkorexia’ A Growing Trend Among College Students While “drunkorexia” is not a medical term, it has become easily understood slang for the practice of swapping food calories for those in alcohol. (universitybusiness.com)

Alcoholic Energy Drink Blamed for Sickening College Students Central Washington University has determined that a high-alcohol energy drink under scrutiny nationwide is what sickened students at an off-campus party this month. (universitybusiness.com)

Facebook Use Consoles Students After Campus Shootings, Temporarily Many students at Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University, two sites of deadly campus shootings in recent years, turned to Facebook as a way to cope. But was the social network an effective outlet for their grief? A study whose results were published last month found that students reported short-term benefits but no long-term effect from reaching out to friends via Facebook. (chronicle.com)

A Plea for More School Counselors A public school educator argues that “the school counselor of today is not the guidance counselor of yesterday” — and is in desperate need of qualified reinforcements. (thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com)

Business Students Look to France for an Education in Luxury New graduate programs in the management of high-end brands draw students from all over the world. (chronicle.com)

Alcohol fuels tensions between college students, police October has been a bad month for college towns as police must respond to increasingly rowdy, sometimes violent, student behavior. (USA Today)