Notes in the Margins: College-choice secrecy, security and accreditation

College Impact 101: Economics In a  2007 study, Lake Superior College added an estimated $98 million dollars to Duluth’s economy. A similar 2009 study by the University of Wisconsin Superior shows that school generated $41.2 million dollars in spending and income for Superior and Douglas County.  But when you break it all down, you’ll find the money students are putting in the pockets of the Twin Ports is for more than just clothing and food. (northlandsnewscenter.com)

Keeping Quiet About a Daughter’s College Choices A mother of a high school senior reflects on the veil of secrecy over her daughter’s wish list, and on how best to keep well-meaning inquiries from outsiders at bay. (thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com)

Police asking for help in identifying witnesses in weekend shooting Winona Police are asking for your help identifying two people that fled from the scene of a shooting near Winona State University on Saturday night. Police say they’re looking for two male witnesses. (google.com)

Educational Difficulties of Men and Immigrants Hinder Efforts to Improve College Attainment A new report by the American Council on Education charts declines in the academic achievement of blacks and Hispanics. The report’s findings show that the nation is not on track to reach President Obama’s goal of having the United States lead the world, by 2020, in the proportion of its residents with a college credential or degree. (chronicle.com)

Report Shows Room for Improvement in Campus Security Eighty-eight percent of colleges cite small budgets and staffs for inadequate preparation, according to the report. (chronicle.com)

Florida Attorney General Opens Investigations Into 5 For-Profit Colleges State investigators are looking into allegations of misrepresentations about financial aid and deceptive recruiting tactics. (chronicle.com)

Center Renews Call for Overhaul of Nation’s Accreditation System The report from the Center for College Affordability and Productivity suggests a replacement system that would focus on concrete measures of performance. (chronicle.com)