Nicole LaPoint argued discrimination after an orthodontist pulled a job offer to her after learning she was two months pregnant and hoped to take maternity time. The orthodontist argued the amount of time off was the concern. Justices today said it’s only discrimination under state law if LaPoint could prove she lost the job because she was pregnant. Read more

In 2014, Mary Cocchiarella gave Donald Driggs $2,400 for the first-month’s rent and security deposit for an apartment in Spring Lake Park. But he told her he still had some work to do on the apartment and she wouldn’t be able to move in for another day. Another day — and many days after that — came and went and still she couldn’t move in.

Is she covered by a Minnesota law offering protections for ‘residential tenants’? Read more

The Minnesota Supreme Court today backed a lower court which had refused to allow a former state employee to sue officials in the Dayton administration for information and remarks given to a Minnesota Public Radio reporter about conditions at the state security hospital in St. Peter. Michael Harlow, a psychiatrist at the hospital, was fired Read more

Under Minnesota tax law, if you spend more than 183 days in the state in a year and you have a home here, you’re a full-time resident of Minnesota, with all the tax implications that come with that rule.

Today, a divided Minnesota Supreme Court reversed a short-term victory to a wealthy Lake Minnetonka couple, who moved back to Minnesota in 2007 and were ordered to pay $650,789.38 in taxes as full-year residents under the law.
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