NoDak school district walks back ‘hooker’ comparison

School officials in Devils Lake, N.D., will hold a meeting with female students today and try — again — to convey a message about the problem with what they wear, this time without comparing them to hookers, apparently.

Fargo Forum reports the superintendent has acknowledged that showing the kids “Pretty Woman” at an assembly recently wasn’t such a good idea.

And yet, Superintendent Scott Privratsky says, there’s still a problem with yoga pants, leggings, and tights.

While some reports have said yoga pants, leggings and tights are banned in Devils Lake schools, they’re not prohibited outright. The policy in the Devils Lake student handbook says they “must be appropriately covered by other clothing,” Privratsky said. “So they aren’t so revealing.”

The intentions of the assistant principal and the female staff member who visited with the students “were good. It was to talk about appropriate school attire. It wasn’t the intention to draw any references to students acting like hookers or prostitutes or anything like that,” he said.

Privratsky added “there may have been a comment that was made that I believe will be retracted by that staff member and apologized for,” though he declined to be more specific about which staff member or the comment made.

Some reports claimed an administrator told the students tight uncovered pants or leggings can be distracting to teachers and other students.

The dust-up over school fashion allows the rest of us to take a trip down memory lane…

“When I was in school, the mini-skirts had to be the length of the fingertips if your arms were held to your body,” Braaten said.

In the 1980s, the “Madonna wannas” would wear crop tops and short skirts. The punk look offered ripped jeans that could give a view of the wearer’s underwear, Braaten said.

Camisoles used to be worn under a blouse to cover underwear. Now they’re used as a blouse, Braaten said.

In the late-1990s and 2000s, low-rise pants and crop tops revealing bare midriffs had elders fuming. And in the past few years, deeply cut blouses, “showing too much of a woman’s charms” set off alarms, Braaten said.

For guys, saggy pants belted below the buttocks with boxer shorts showing were banned in many schools, as well as anything showing signs of gang affiliation, she said.

The Devils Lake superintendent says it might not be a bad idea to talk to the boys about their dress, too.

Archive: The great yoga pants rebellion of 2014 (NewsCut)

  • Kassie
  • joetron2030

    Maybe the district needs to talk to the parents, too. Dictate how they dress. It wouldn’t surprise me if a lot of the mothers and female guardians also dress the same way as these girls with yoga pants, leggings, and tights.

    And what about the female teachers and other staff members in the district? Do they have a dress code that requires no yoga pants, leggings, and/or tights?

    • Veronica

      I’m sitting here wearing yoga pants at work. Granted, I own my own company and I can do whatever the heck I want, but SO WHAT? And yes, my daughter wears yoga pants from time to time. There is NOTHING indecent about wearing yoga pants. Or do I need to wear a full, floor length skirt so nobody knows I have a rear end?

      This discussion being ONLY directed at females is really irritating.

      • joetron2030

        I agree. The point I was trying to make is that if they’re going to make the kids adhere to some arbitrary dress code, that adults around them should be required to model the same behavior.

    • Kassie

      Or we could teach men to respect women regardless of what they are wearing and let girls wear they see fit.

      And yeah, their moms probably are wearing yoga pants and leggings because they are super comfortable and flattering for most women.

      • joetron2030

        See my reply to Veronica above, please.

  • What about wearing an onion on one’s belt?

    • joetron2030

      That sure was the style back in the day!

  • Tom Johnson

    It can readily be solved with mandatory school uniforms which is one solution becoming more common in inner city schools. Barring that, when I was teaching at college, it was an easy reminder to many of my students that the likelihood of them obtaining employment dressed as they were for class would be severely diminished (regardless of their talent). For the various high school and junior high school students, it has also been easy. I tell them their dress will affect how they are treated. You may be cool among your peers but you will attract attention, probably the wrong kind from adults. Personally, depending on the setting, the sweat suits, leggings and all the rest just look lazy like you really don’t care how you look.

    • Kassie

      This is just perpetuating rape culture. When you say “dress how you want to be treated” it suggest that if a woman is dressed provocatively she wants to have sex with you.

      And I wore tie dye and jeans every day in college. Did I wear that to job interviews? Of course not. Teenagers aren’t stupid, don’t treat them like they are.

      • Tom Johnson

        I didn’t make any differentiation based on sex so you have misconstrued my comments as being about women and has nothing to do with sex. You brought up dressing provocatively and merely indicates to me that a woman is trying to attract attention. The definition of the word provocative is “causing annoyance, anger, or another strong reaction, especially deliberately.” You also assumed, erroneously, my comment about college students and then mixed that up with being a teenager. Granted, I could have graduated college as a “teenager” but almost all students are not teenagers when they graduate college and go looking for a job. Having been in a position to hire college students for various jobs over 30 years, these days students do come to job interviews in sweat suits tie dyed shirts and leggings, not realizing the error of dressing appropriate to the position. You were at least smart enough not to wear your jeans and tie dye to an interview.