Where heroes once stood

Long-time NewsCut readers probably know that there may be no neighborhood in America I have more fondness for than the Riverside Circle neighborhood of Moorhead, where I spent more than a week in 2009 covering the residents’ fight against the flooding Red River.

I took this stitched-together panorama in the backyard of Donna and Todd Morse (sorry, iPeople, it’s in Flash and you won’t see it):

Panorama of All along the Red River on CleVR.com

Some real heroes once stood on the site…

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There’s no flood this year, but it’s a sadder scene in that spot today than it was back then.

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The Morse family has taken the buyout offered to the people who put up such a fight in 2009 (and 2011).

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Up and down the street, houses are on trailers, ready to go.

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No doubt, there’s a fair amount of heartbreak, but change happens, time moves on, and neighborhoods die.

“We will be the only house remaining on this side of the street,” John Brummer said in an e-mail to me today. Neighbor Keith Miller took the photographs.

  • John P.

    With great respect for what John Brummer and his neighbors accomplished.

    “We will be the only house remaining on this side of the street,”

    That’s a pretty good sign that the city and most neighbors have decided it’s not a good place for a house.

  • Bob Collins

    // That’s a pretty good sign that the city and most neighbors have decided it’s not a good place for a house.

    It’s not NOW. But it was when the neighborhoods were built. These people paid the price for the practices and actions of people downstream, and — moreover — people who are miles away from the river.

  • http://blog.greenlightdesigns.us Jordan

    I agree with Bob here. I’m from Grand Forks, ND, and lived through the record flooding that hit the town in 1997. There was no precedent for the river to even get anywhere near that level. My dad’s business, while it backed up to the Red Lake River, had never flooded in the over 75 years that structures stood in that location. We had no reason to believe that it could even get that high. The weather service didn’t even think it would as crest predictions were under by about five feet right up to the time the river passed that mark.

    People said it was crazy to build homes where they were in Grand Forks, but up until 1997 it was never even near a problem for most neighborhoods, and the neighborhoods where it was were well prepared for the initial crest predictions.

    Grand Forks was much more willing to make the sacrifices necessary to build permanent flood protection than Fargo/Moorhead have been, but Fargo/Moorhead haven’t experienced the total decimation that parts of Grand Forks experienced.