What’s it like to get hit by a pitch?

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The Minnesota Twins have been getting savaged this year by Twin Cities sportswriters. None of them, so far, has dared try to be a baseball player to see if the game is as easy as they might think it is.

In Kansas City, a sportswriter wrote that a player for the Royals should have allowed himself to be hit by a pitch. Easy, right? Sure, unless you’re a player getting hit by a baseball.

Big points go to the blogger for the Kansas City Star who found out — voluntarily — what it’s like to get hit by a pitch.

This sort of thing could catch on. The next logical step is for politicians to invite political reporters to pass a budget.

  • Paul

    I’d rather be hit by a baseball (or a variety of other projectiles) than try to accomplish something in the legislature.

  • Joanna

    Dang! hats off.

  • Josh

    Let’s see Jabba the Reusse take a pitch like that.

  • Jim Shapiro

    In direct response to “What’s it like to get hit by a pitch?

    Depends on velocity of the pitch, and of course, where. Assuming it’s a fastball:

    Muscle: It hurts.

    Funnybone, shin, hand: It hurts a lot.

    Face, head: You might die.

    Naughty bits: You WISH you were dead. 🙂

  • Disco

    Does that reporter make $1,000,000 a year? Because that’s what Wilson Betemit makes. For that much money, I could stand up to a 79-mph slider too.

  • John P.

    It’s not uncommon for baseball players to take one for the team. Brandon Inge of the Tigers seems to do it a lot. Inge mostly wears a huge shirt and tries toget the ball to hit that.

    A couple guys on the White Sox this week seemed to be standing firm when they could have moved. I think they try to take a glancing blow instead of a direct hit.

  • Kevin Watterson

    Having been both hit by a pitch and tried to accomplish something in the Legislature, I can say they are both unpleasant.

  • Bob Collins

    JohnP, Don Baylor comes to mind.

  • kennedy

    Judging by the players reactions, that writer will be at the front of the line for interviews and stories.