Where’d all the issues go?

The three major-party candidates for governor debated in Duluth this morning. As with past debates, the answers were predictable because they’ve been pretty much the same answers since the primary election. DFLer Mark Dayton, GOPer Tom Emmer, and IPer Tom Horner debated in a session organized by the Duluth News Tribune.

It doesn’t appear that many issues other than those surrounding business will be debated in this election. Most of the debates sponsored so far, have been sponsored by business organizations.

There’s no question that the economy is issue #1, but what are issues #2, 3, and 4?

Here’s the list of issues which more than 32,000 people ranked (via Select A Candidate) in the gubernatorial election four years ago:

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2006 was pre-meltdown, of course. But 2008 wasn’t. Here’s the issues rankings by 44,283 who took the Select A Candidate survey in the Senate race that year in Minnesota.

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Curiously, “job creation” has not been the overwhelming issue ranked as “most important” by the 12,000+ taking this year’s Select A Candidate quiz for governor.

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  • Theresa

    Shocked to see that abortion and same-sex marriage are so much more important than jobs. And here I was thinking that by moving to Mpls I would be moving away from all the religious bigotry that has worked so hard to destroy the South. Have y’all learned nothing from us???

  • Bob Collins

    The fact that abortion and same-sex marriage were highly ranked doesn’t mean that it’s highly ranked b/c of people who have one particular opinion on the issue.

  • Zebulun

    Interesting numbers. I have to say that I am flummoxed by the high importance placed on the Vikings stadium relative to other things, like agriculture policy. If people care about energy policy, they had better pay attention to agriculture policy.

  • Bob Moffitt

    “The fact that abortion and same-sex marriage were highly ranked doesn’t mean that it’s highly ranked b/c of people who have one particular opinion on the issue.”

    True, but that doesn’t mean the numbers are NOT driven by people with one particular view, either. We just don’t know.

  • Jennifer

    I amazed that the debates haven’t really discussed healthcare or education much yet. Not only because they are such important issues (they are) but also because they are such a large portion of the budget.