Golden Snowball Challenge: Current snow estimates

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Here are the latest unofficial entries in this leg of News Cut’s “Golden Snowball Challenge,” the competition between area meteorologists to see how most accurately predicts snowfall in the Twin Cities.

Meteorologist
Prediction
Official
Belinda Jensen (KARE)
10-13"
11.5"
Craig Edwards (MPR)
14"
14"
Jonathan Yuhas (KARE)
6-12"
9"
Chris Shaffer (WCCO)
19-21"
20"
Erik Maitland (KMSP)
6-12"
9"
Keith Marler (KMSP)
10-14"
12"
Huttner, Paul (MPR)
12-18"
15"
Paul Douglas
8-12"
10"
Ron Trenda (WCCO)
9-14"
11.5"
Patrick Hammer (KSTP)
7-14"
10.5"
Dave Dahl (KSTP)
8-14"
11"
National Weather Serivce
16-22"
19"
Ian Leonard (KMSP)
10-14″
12″

With two storms already completed, here are the current standings:

Meteorologist
Storms
Points
Average
Patrick Hammer (KSTP)
1
10
10
Paul Huttner
2
17
8.5
National

Weather Service

2
4
2
Chikage Windler (KSTP)
1
0
0
Mike Fairbourne (WCCO)
1
0
0
Jonathan Yuhas (KARE)
1
0
0
Mike Augustyniak (WCCO

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1
-5
-5
Keith Marler (KMSP)
1
-5
-5
Don Moldenhauer (BMTN)
1
-5
-5
Ian Leonard (KMSP)
1
-8
-8
Paul Douglas (MinnPost)
1
-8
-8

If you’re a weather stat freak — and even if you’re not — here are the top snowfalls of all-time, as reported by the Minnesota Climatology Working Group at the University of Minnesota.

28.4 inches: October 31 – November 3, 1991 (Halloween Blizzard)

21.1 inches: November 29 – December 1, 1985

20.0 inches: January 22 – January 23, 1982

17.4 inches: January 20 – January 21, 1982

16.8 inches: November 11 – November 12, 1940 (See story on Armistice Day Blizzard)

16.7 inches: March 3 – March 4, 1985

16.7 inches: March 11 – March 14, 1940

16.5 inches: December 27 – December 28, 1982

16.0 inches: January 20 – January 21, 1917

16.0 inches: March 8 – March 9, 1999

14.7 inches: March 31, 1985

  • BJ

    16.0 inches: March 8 – March 9, 1999

    Oh I remember that one, very well.

    My first high school girlfriend was stuck at my house for several hours before her parents could come and get her or before mine got home.

  • Sara B

    My grandfather was aboard one of the few ships to survive on Lake Superior during the Armistice Day Blizzard. My grandmother initially was told his ship had sank in the storm. Before he passed away he told his story to my aunt, who wrote it out long-hand for our family, complete with photos. The photos are amazing. I’m grateful to my aunt for capturing his story.

  • http://www.mixmobi.com Lisa Foote

    I remember driving downtown the Monday after the Halloween Blizzard in 1991. There were walls of snow over six feet high on either side of the street. It was like driving in a tunnel. They ended up dumping the snow in the river — there was no where else to move it.

    I also remember a 10′ pile of snow in a far corner of the Southdale parking lot on May 1, 1992.

  • Julie

    I remember the radio alarm going off Nov. 1, hearing the MPR host (I think it was Gary Eichten) declaring, “well there’s 16 inches on the ground and it’s still coming down” and thinking -SNOW DAY! YAAA!

  • Brian

    I still remember the Halloween Blizzard. Down by the Iowa border we missed out on almost all of the snow but were left with 2-3″ of ice and no electricity for ten days. Being twelve years old at the time made that scenario even more miserable. I still hate hearing about even the chance of ice.

  • Derek

    I remember vividly the Halloween blizzard. I was 11 or 12 and decided that I wasn’t devoted enough to Halloween to head out. My younger brother, however, was. He went out in a home made Ninja Turtles costume that was mostly felt and batting. He came back several times to get brushed off and by the time he was done must have weighed an extra 15 pounds. The next morning was one of the only times my school had closed because of weather in its history. Best snowstorm ever.