Five at 8 – 9/14/09: Harvesting help

The Monday Morning Rouser is a teambuilder. Turn up your speakers, grab four or five of your cubicle-farm neighbors. And make sure someone takes a picture of what is bound to happen next.

I have to get through today’s 5@8 before Kanye West grabs the keyboard…

1) While Brooklyn Center resident Bobby Fern worked in his garden in recent years, neighbor Norm Arneson used to stop by and chat. That was until Arneson was beaten near Christmas in what the police chief said was the most senseless and cowardly crime he ever saw. So this year, Fern decided his garden would be used to help Arneson. Neighbors showed up to help. Now, it’s harvest time.

pigglywiggly.gif 2) Have we seen the last of the Piggly Wiggly store brand in Minnesota? Cripes, they’ll be closing up the Rexall Stores next.

3) More reasons why you can’t believe polls. Most Americans support a public option in health care. Most Americans say they’d be opposed to health care reform if it includes a public option.

4) Daniel Ellsberg — that Daniel Ellsberg — has posted the first installment of his online memoir of the nuclear era. Ellsberg, you may recall, worked with the Departments of Defense and State on issues of nuclear control. In the first installment, he recounts a single-sheet of research for the president: How many would die in a nuclear war? 275-325 million. It was intentionally understated.

The revelation? You didn’t have to be the president to launch a nuclear war:


I reported what I had learned in the Pacific, one of the most sensitive secrets in the system: that to forestall the possibility that our retaliatory response might be paralyzed either by a Soviet attack on Washington or by presidential incapacity, President Eisenhower had as of 1958 secretly delegated to theater commanders the authority to launch nuclear operations in a crisis, either in the event of the physical unavailability of the president–Eisenhower himself had suffered both a stroke and a heart attack in office–or if communications with Washington were cut off.

(h/t: Nick Young)

5) Last week we got an e-mail in the newsroom because a story about Minnesota’s reaction to President Obama’s speech to Congress included one person who didn’t like it. That, the writer said, shows a bias against Obama. So the new survey from the Pew Research Center may not be about the news media as much as it is about the people who consume the news. The survey says a record number of Americans now believe the news to be inaccurate. Just 29 percent of Americans say the news media generally gets the facts correct, according to the survey. One-hundred percent of those surveyed believe media is a singular noun.

A perfect example: Respected political analyst Michael Barone stooped to the “media hates conservatives” meme to make an otherwise logical point over the weekend.


It appears that something like 1 million people came to Washington yesterday and participated in the Tea Party march that filled Pennsylvania Avenue from the Treasury to the Capitol and then went onto the Mall. Mainstream Media responded with typical inattention or derision…

Oh, stop it. Here’s NPR’s story that aired Saturday evening. Not an ounce of derision. Not an ounce of opposition. It aired back-to-back with the story about Obama’s appearance in Minneapolis at the top of Saturday’s All Things Considered.

Facts can be infuriating things.

Bonus. Well deserved. Worthington dedicates a painting of Quentin Aanenson (Worthington Daily Globe – reg. required)

TODAY’S QUESTION

The St. Paul City Council is considering an ordinance that would hold you responsible if underage drinking occurs in your home or rental property, regardless of whether you supply the liquor. Similar ordinances are in effect in other cities, including Chaska. Should parents be held responsible if guests of their kids drink?

WHAT WE’RE DOING

Midmorning (9-11 a.m.) – First hour: St. Paul’s social host ordinance.


Should St. Paul adopt a social hosting ordinance?(polls)

Second hour: Jay Coogan, the new president of the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, on the value of an MFA, the importance of arts education, and how artists can help solve real-world problems.

Midday (11 a.m. – 1 p.m.) - A look back, and a discussion of the lessons learned, on the one-year anniversary of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy.

Talk of the Nation (1-3 p.m.) - First hour: Oh dear, someone is still talking about Rep. Joe Wilson. The chance of hearing something that hasn’t been said in the last four days? Zero.

Second hour: TBD

All Things Considered (3-6:30 p.m.) – The Minnesota Department of health is meeting today with people on the front line of dealing with H1N1. MPR’s Lorna Benson is covering the story.

NPR will be covering President Obama’s speech on the economic meltdown, a preview of Jay Leno’s nightly show. A poll of doctors on health care, and a fantasy football league for women.

  • Tyler

    Oh c’mon. You can’t expect us to believe the MSM when the Star Trib gets so many stories wrong…

  • Jay

    Regarding Mr. Barone’s crowd estimate. Apparently the real numbers were between 60 and 70 thousand. Nate Silver has a neat piece about the inflation of crowd estimates at fiverthirtyeight.com

  • http://www.lungmn.org Bob Moffitt

    Our people are at the MDH briefing on H1N1, as you might expect.

  • GregS

    “Oh, stop it. Here’s NPR’s story that aired Saturday evening. Not an ounce of derision. Not an ounce of opposition. It aired back-to-back with the story about Obama’s appearance in Minneapolis at the top of Saturday’s All Things Considered.”

    Uh Bob?

    Here’s NPR’s coverage from April 15, 2009

    Why Protest Big Government With Tea On Tax Day?

    Here is the first quote, “”The tea parties don’t represent a spontaneous outpouring of public sentiment. They’re AstroTurf (fake grass roots) events, manufactured by the usual suspects,” economist Paul Krugman wrote in Monday’s New York Times.

    Paul Krugman??

    Not one conservative was quoted.

    Not one line written from a conservative perspective.

    Well now, maybe the years of yelling “DO SOMETHING ABOUT THE INSANE LEFTIST BIGOTRY OF PUBLIC RADIO” has paid off.

    Read the entire article to get a taste of what NPR is like when no one is breathing over their shoulder.

  • Bob Collins

    Barone wasn’t talking about April 15, 2009. He was talking about September 12, 2009.

    It’s far too easy for anyone to throw around “the media” to create a singular force that’s against whatever one stands for.

    Far more accurate would be to cite individual assailants rather than commit such a sweeping conclusion.

    By the way, can you be a grassroots effort when your event is organized by a media institution?

    I notice, for example, that the Patriot 1280 is organizing a protest here in Minnesota this week. Is that grassoorts? Or is that just good marketing?

  • GregS

    Bob,

    Michael Barone did not single out NPR, you did. I only thought it fair to point out how over the top NPR has been in the past.

    “By the way, can you be a grassroots effort when your event is organized by a media institution? – Bob Collins”

    Sure, the same way grass roots efforts are put together with government finances…..like how Barak Obama’s grass-roots efforts were funded in Chicago.

    Another way is to use billions ripped off from the poor of the world, like the money that trickles down from George Soros to various grass-roots efforts.

  • Bob Collins

    Well, that’s kind of my point, GregS. Barone referred to “the media” as a singular.

    He said THE MEDIA treated the Saturday event with derision. What he should have identified is which media done that or said SOME media did that (which of course would mean some media did not).

    The rest of your message, I just sort of skimmed because I’m trying to cut down on how much of my life reading the same thing over and over. (g)

    I don’t mean to single you out but I’m growing more disinterested each day with both sides repeating the same thing to each other.

    At some point it becomes like “Groundhog Day” without Bill Murray.

  • GregS

    “He said THE MEDIA treated the Saturday event with derision. What he should have identified is which media done that or said SOME media did that (which of course would mean some media did not).

    I agree.

    We should not generalize. In this instance, NPR did not follow its pattern of bias. But fair is fair, if NPR is usually biased, which I demonstrated it to be, then you should have mentioned how rare an event this was.

    “I don’t mean to single you out but I’m growing more disinterested each day with both sides repeating the same thing to each other. – Bob Collins”

    It’s a process. Soon your disinterest will occur prior to a partisan statement, instead of prior to the reply (g)

    The fact is both left and right “grass-roots” campaigns are heavily funded by groups with deep pockets.

  • Bob Collins

    You know me, Greg. I’m old school. Back in the say we just referred to what you whippersnappers call “partisan statements” as “observations with which I disagree.”

  • GregS

    Bob,

    Why the sour connotation on “partisan statements”? There is nothing wrong with being partisan, unless of course, one claims to be non-partisan.

    People should be partisan – but respect each other and invite the other side to the table for banter and debate.

    The only exception is – tax-payer funds to partisan political groups. I do not think I need go into the reason why.

    Interestingly, I read today on CBSNews that ACORN, a far left grass-roots group, has gotten “ten of millions” in tax-payer funds. (and yes, THE MEDIA showed up stylishly late for that party)

    Hey, that kind of bucks, sure beats begging nickels from “a media institution.”