Five at One: Busy Day Edition

Yes, it’s tradition to have these link posts ready to go at 8 a.m., but things got busy. Do understand.

  • Since Jeff Horwich at MPR’s In the Loop broke the story of Fox 9 News’ plans to do a child abduction story where a reporter in an unmarked SUV was to attempt to talk to school kids in Edina, he’s followed up with KMSP’s reaction.

    Which turns out to be not much of a reaction.

    Jeff’s still got several unanswered questions, but perhaps this best sums its all up.

    WHAT were you thinking? Really — what were you thinking? No, I mean it: What were you thinking?

    (Hint: The May sweeps period begins tomorrow.)

    MinnPost media watcher David Brauer calls the plan “not only amoral, but inane“.


  • Apparently the Yankees are having trouble filling all those expensive seats at their expensive new stadium.

    Seriously, $2,625 to watch a ballgame? The franks had better be outstanding. Seats at the Minnesota Twins’ Target Field will top out at $275 a pop next year.


  • While the professional blogger on-staff is on vacation, it’s certain a hub-bub about professional blogging will spring up. Former Clinton pollster Mark Penn digs up some dubious numbers about how much (and how many) bloggers are earning.

    Penn writes:

    Already more Americans are making their primary income from posting their opinions than Americans working as computer programmers or firefighters.

    Statistics for Journalism 101, the mean and median can be very different things.


  • And as long as we’re all throwing around ginormous numbers, it’s worth perusing WallStats’ 2009 Death and Taxes interactive graphic.

  • Justin Vernon, aka Bon Iver, returned to his alma mater over the weekend in a special way — to join Eau Claire’s Memorial High School jazz band for a spring concert. Bon Iver’s acclaimed 2008 record For Emma, Forever Ago is simply put, a great album.

    Here’s Justin singing “For Emma” with the jazz band.

    • bsimon

      “Already more Americans are making their primary income from posting their opinions than Americans working as computer programmers or firefighters.”

      Clearly I’m doing something wrong; I do this for free (and, in fact, get paid to program).

      On the other hand, if this refers to Penn:

      “Statistics for Journalism 101, the mean and median can be very different things,” Perhaps the outcome of Senator Clinton’s campaign for President has finally been explained.