Same-sex marriage proponents try another verse

Yesterday was the day gays and lesbians — some of them, anyway — were to stay home from work as a display of both their economic clout and their place within the community. It was called “Call in Gay Day.” How did it go?

It fizzled, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.


Several gay and lesbian people said they couldn’t afford to take the day off, particularly in a tightening economy where many are concerned about their jobs. And in the Castro district, business owners were livid that people were encouraged to not shop during the holidays, a peak time for retailers.

The day was intended to be another demonstration against Proposition 8, the California referendum that changed the state Constitution to elimiante the right of same-sex couples to marry.

In Chicago, many of those who called in sick attended a protest outside the Cook County Courthouse. But there were only about 100 people there and Chicago is preoccupied with other things these days, apparently.

In the Twin Cities, there were a handful of activities, but none that appeared to generate a significant (that is “newsworthy,” apparently) response.

Opponents of Proposition 8 are not without ideas. A “viral video” spreading quickly is “Proposition 8: The Musical,” featuring John C. Reilly, Neil Patrick Harris, Maya Rudolph, and Jack Black as Jesus Christ. It was written by Marc Shaiman, the composer of Hairspray.

In a week since its release, it’s had over 3 million views, although it’s unclear, of course, whether it’s reaching anybody who voted for the measure in California. There’s always the possibility that the choir is preaching to the choir.

  • Alison

    I’m really tired of some members of the GLBT community thinking that they are helping us gain equality by pissing off straight people, including the ones who are on our side. This isn’t King’s Civil Rights movement. Yeah, it’s a tragedy that gays can’t marry. I lobby my legilators regularly about the issue myself. However, this is not a tragedy on par with Jim Crow, so the same tactics won’t be effective. We got to 48% of people voting against Prop 8 by straight people getting to know good, normal gay people that they could still relate to. The way we’ll get to 51% and beyond is the same steady process. It’s not as glamorous, but in the end it will be far more effective because straight allies will be, and already are, doing the advocating with us.