Marty is in

John Marty may make another run for governor if he can convince John Marty to run. A new Web site, johnmarty.org, says:


Our state and nation face challenges that will not be solved by business as usual – the worst economic times since the great depression, the foreclosure crisis, rising unemployment, and increasing economic and social disparities. These challenges require the kind of change that is only available from a leader of vision and courage.

That’s why we are encouraging John Marty to run for Governor and are forming an exploratory campaign. Please join us!

We are encouraging Senator Marty to run for Governor because of his vision, his strength, his integrity and his courage.

The Web site coincides with a mass e-mailing of the announcement. The return address says it’s from John Marty. The Web site is paid for by Minnesotans for Marty. The address of Minnesotans for Marty is Marty’s Roseville home.

Marty ran for governor in 1994, garnering 33% of the vote, against incumbent Arne Carlson.

Other candidates in the race for the DFL nomination are Sen. Tom Bakk, Ramsey County Attorney Susan Gaertner, and Rep. Paul Thissen.

  • MR

    We’ve seen this movie before–the ending will be the same, and it will still be sad.

  • PS

    I think the political climate in this state is fundamentally different than it was in 1994 and 1998. After 8 disastrous years in Washington, it’s clear that the American people and Minnesotans are looking for a different kind of candidate, as seen in the election of President-elect Obama. I think that the time for Sen. Marty to run is now, and I think he will serve valorously as Governor of this state.

  • Joel Clemmer

    Rest assured that the John Marty Exploratory Committee is powered by citizens who genuinely what our state to consider a progressive who has shown courage. Let’s take this opportunity very seriously, as the state needs to change direction, as does the country.

  • bob Collins

    Can I just say that a 7 week respite from campaigning for office is not nearly enough.

  • Alison

    I like Marty, but I’m with you, Bob.

  • Rebecca

    As one involved with John Marty’s exploratory run for governor, I am deeply saddened that someone listed as an MPR news reporter would put out a story without checking his facts. If he wanted the names of some of the many people who have urged Senator Marty to run, all he had to do was ask – there are plenty. The address for Minnesotans for Marty (which is not even in Roseville) is not that of Senator Marty. The statistic quoted understates the amount of the vote that Senator Marty received…. This sort of commentary belies MPR’s hard-earned reputation for sticking to the facts. I hope we can convince Senator Marty to run. The citizens of Minnesota need a leader with his vision, integrity and energy.

  • Bob Collins

    More facts:

    -1- I am NOT listed as an MPR reporter.

    -2- I never said that people WEREN’T trying to get John Marty to run. I said Minnesotans for Marty’s official address is Marty’s house.

    -3- I said that Marty lost in a landslide to Arne Carlson.

    I agree, we should stick to the facts, which is why I’m requiring you to tell me which of these is not one?

    There’s a fair amount of theater in politics. Some campaigns start off with a “draft XYZ” Web site, to create the impression (which may even be backed by fact) of a groundswell of support trying to get a reluctant would-be candidate to decide to run. Is that what this Web site was designed to do?

    There’s a ‘dance’ that candidates do two years before an election. The average person, perhaps, might read an exploratory campaign Web site and see that we’re being invited to “encourage” a candidate to run for office. The average person might think we’re talking about “words” of encouragement. But the sites that spring up are really talking code. I can’t imagine it’s fun to ask for money, but that’s the form of encouragement the candidates are talking about without actually saying it: Send me money.

    And why two years early? Because you have to get to the big money before the other candidates get to it. And so candidates announce their ‘exploratory committees’ earlier and earlier and earlier.

    That doesn’t make a candidate good or bad. But I don’t feel particularly compelled to pretend that’s not what’s happening here and elsewhere in the gubernatorial campaign at the moment. If I were a reporter, I might even consider it part of my job.

  • Rebecca

    Real facts:

    1)” MPR’s Cathy Wurzer spoke with Minnesota Public Radio’s online reporter Bob Collins, the author of a new Web feature called News Cut — a fresh take on the … “2007/10/12 – straight from MPR.org

    2) Minnesotans for Marty does not use Senator Marty’s residence as its address — check the website – you might have looked at a residual/dormant campaign finance listing left over from 1998. The current listing at Campaign Finance should now reflect the new address.

    3) You quoted an incorrect percentage, but yes there was a landslide – of course that was a very republican year and Arne was a very popular incumbent governor but I don’t really expect you to bring that up.

    John Marty is not your typical politician. The exploratory campaign really is about encouraging Senator Marty to run and the web site truly is intended to invite words of encouragement and involvement just as much as it is intended to allow/encourage donations from committed supporters. This is a grassroots operation.

    I know a lot of politicians do the dance and speak in code. However Senator Marty has a well-deserved reputation for integrity and has never been about big money. For most of his career, including the gubernatorial run in 1994 and this exploratory campaign, he has not accepted money from lobbyists and PACS and he has limited contributions to $100/person/year.

    Many campaigns may be all about “getting the big money” but this one, refreshingly, is NOT.

    Building a campaign person by person takes more time than building a campaign with special interest money.

    Take a closer look, you might like what you see.