The way girls dress

A school board member in the Perham-Dent School District has given public voice to something we old curmudgeons have been muttering since the days when we dropped our kids off at school: how do those girls get out of the house dressed like that?

“They looked like they were at a brothel rather than at a football game,” said Bridgit Pankonin at a recent school board meeting, as reported by the Worthington Daily Globe (registration possibly required).

The Minnesota State High School League spectator conduct policy says only that attire must cover the entire torso.

In the end, the school board decided not to try to legislate the attire girls — or boys for that matter — wear away from school, figuring that merely raising the subject would start a conversation in the district.

  • Carol

    Oh relax! I don’t always like what ‘kids these days’ are wearing, but remember that girls were once considered “fast and loose” if they wore lipstick to High School! It’s a perpetual generational thing – remember what your parents didn’t like about your attire when you were in High School? These kids will grow up soon enough and figure out that what they wore was inappropriate, and do the same censorious thing to their kids some day. Oh, and just so you understand where I’m coming from, I’m 45.

  • Bob Collins

    //remember what your parents didn’t like about your attire when you were in High School?

    For the record, my mother bought what I wore to school. But that’s a whole ‘nother thread.

  • Tony

    This is a delicate subject, which needs to be dealt with in terms of both genders. Both men and women are capable of dressing immodestly. It’s good that the school board is pushing back against foolish displays of youthful ignorance. It’s necessary in order to maintain civilized decency. If nothing was said, eventually those who desire to push the limits of indecency would go further and further into uncivilized behavior. Anyone who suggests that society should just look the other way, while glibly chuckling that “teens will be teens”, is sadly lacking in understanding the damage inflicted on society when we allow uncivilized behavior to go unchecked. The school board is doing their job, by protecting the civilized majority in society from the uncivilized few. This is right and good. In a nation ruled by laws, there are things you can do, and things you can’t do.

  • bsimon

    Tony writes

    “Anyone who suggests that society should just look the other way, while glibly chuckling that “teens will be teens”, is sadly lacking in understanding the damage inflicted on society when we allow uncivilized behavior to go unchecked. The school board is doing their job, by protecting the civilized majority in society from the uncivilized few.”

    Tony, are you sure about the relative proportions of the civilized vs uncivilized?

  • Joel

    On the one hand I don’t think I’d say that a society’s attire is the mark of being civilized or not, but on the other hand, it does seem to me that childrens’ fashion are a little too lax.

  • Anna

    As the parent of a four-year-old girl I am often appalled by the clothing available in little girls’ sizes – not toddlers, mind, but the sizes my daughter is moving into (the sort you might buy for your tall pre-schooler or kindergartner). It only gets worse as the sizes get bigger. There must be someone who thinks it’s okay to dress their little darling like a Bratz doll or the clothes wouldn’t be on the racks, but it sure isn’t me. If a kid starts like that (dressing like a Bratz doll) at 5 and 6, how can we expect that same kid to know better at 15 and 16? I can only hope that by teaching lessons now and leading by example my daughter will learn about appropriate attire as she gets older and is making her own choices.

  • http://www.trailblz.com Brian Hanf

    My 6 year old just started kindergarten and the school handbook had several pages on clothing.