The question that must be answered

In his excellent piece today on last night’s Barack Obama rally, Minnesota Public Radio reporter Tom Scheck includes this smackdown from Gov. Tim Pawlenty:


“Three or so years ago, Barack Obama was a state legislator,” he said. “And before that I think the sum total of his leadership experience related to being a community organizer. Those are not normally the credentials you would associate that would next lead you to be the leader of the free world.”

It is the question that must be asked again, and this time… answered. When it comes to picking the person who might well be the next president of the United States, what are the qualifications?

  • BRIAN

    Gov. Pawlenty is, of course, quite right.

    There is no good answer to why 20,000 apparently crazy people could possibly think that this fellow, Barry Hussein Obama, with no bona fides in government or business, with zero foreign policy experience, and a sketchy personal background, could be considered “Presidential” timber.

  • chris

    Brian, I don’t see why not. It doesn’t look like Bush’s ‘extensive’ foreign policy education has helped him much in his term as president. His time as president has done so much damage to American perception throughout the world that we might as well adopt an isolationist policy for all we are welcomed other places.

    Maybe these ‘crazy’ people are ready for a leader who’s not an entrenched member of our political quagmire, and can look at governing a people with a fresh set of eyes?

    I would imagine, at this point, a presidential candidate should be concerned with the welfare of his (or her, of course) people, their education, health, and well-being. They should be a strategic planner and react quickly and rationally in emergencies.

    I would love to add that they would be immune to corruption and temptation, but I realize that is a lot to ask…

  • Jim

    Seems to me he has plenty of credentials to be a leader, and a dynamic and charismatic presence to boot. I’m sure he’s in good standing credential-wise with any leader in American history.

  • Daveg

    His time as president has done so much damage to American perception throughout the world that we might as well adopt an isolationist policy for all we are welcomed other places.

    Or maybe the leadership skills developed through having actually had leadership experience stood him in good stead when he determined that US goals and interests should not come second to the opinions of countries with different agendas than ours.

    Maybe experienced leadership trumps inexperienced leadership in knowing when to stand up, and when to roll over.

    These are determinations each of us have to make for ourselves. I wouldn’t call either decision “crazy,” but I would question the thought processes that would go into deciding that change, any change at all, is sure to be a good thing. Particularly if the selected agent of change has no actual record of having been able to bring about the changes that are so easily promised, you so very hard to deliver on. And especially if the presumptive agent of change actually did have an opportunity to demonstrate a change with a new brand of cleaner, brighter, shinier politics, but had failed to deliver.

  • Anna B

    I think that having spent his early years in several countries (actual “on the ground” international experience), a solid academic background, and the ability to speak clearly, coherently, and in grammatically correct sentences are all sure signs that Mr. Obama is smart (and savvy) enough to be president. Heck, after the last few years of listening to W. slaughter my native tongue, I’m willing to elect the guy just because he can pronounce “nuclear” correctly.

    Years of experience as a community organizer, and all that entails, is perhaps as much an asset as years in the Senate or in a governor’s mansion. It’s not always what’s on the resume, but the so called “soft skills” that point to good leadership and the best fit for any position – no matter if the open job is president or office receptionist.

  • Bob Collins

    I think some of you missed the point of the question.

    It wasn’t about Obama’s qualifications to be president. It was about Pawlenty’s.

    Thus the irony of the governor’s smackdown.

  • MR

    If you want to be picky about it, George W. Bush had significantly less experience in elected office when he was elected president. He had served 5 years as governor, and prior to that he had done various business ventures, none of which seemed to be terribly successful. He had basically zero foreign policy experience when he was elected.

    Even more important than the president him (or her)-self are the advisers and experts that the president chooses to surround him/herself with.

  • JD
  • Daveg

    Even more important than the president him (or her)-self are the advisers and experts that the president chooses to surround him/herself with.

    Which I would agree totally with, but unfortunately have to add that the track record of neither the incumbent nor the challenger in that respect are very good. I don’t know where the other candidate is headed with regards to that, but I would expect more of the same crowd to re-appear.

    That said, I’m not local and have no opinion one way or the other on Gov. Pawlenty or his qualifications, so I’ll refrain from hijacking the thread any more than already done.

  • Nikki

    Pawlenty has great qualifications to be president if our nation’s goal is to uphold the legacy of this tainted administration!

    – Zero grasp on reality pertaining to education, healthcare, immigration- WOW! the recent education bill…need I say more!

    – A list of money hungry cronies

    – A healthy dose of absolute ignorance

    – Disregard for ethical foreign policy

    – Zero remorse for disregarding public opinion and values.

  • http://www.trailblz.com Brian Hanf

    Bob – I know you want this to be about Pawlenty, we all have things we are disappointed with.

    So that being said….

    Anna B wrote “I think that having spent his early years in several countries (actual “on the ground” international experience), ”

    Anna, you might not know that Senator John McCain has some “on the ground” international experience as well. Well it might be called more a “in the box” experience. I think that might count for a bit.

    I have not made up my mind yet on either candidate. I have only voted 1 time for a “Major” party candidate for President. The first election I could vote in was 1992 by the way.

  • bsimon

    “you might not know that Senator John McCain has some “on the ground” international experience as well. Well it might be called more a “in the box” experience. I think that might count for a bit.”

    It is not clear how being held in a box for 4 years helps a person better understand international relations. Its not like he was out collecting experience that give him unique insight into other peoples’ way of life. Senator McCain’s military experience is certainly relevant to his qualifications to higher office & his refusal to accept special treatment from his captors speaks to his character. But it does not amount to the kind of international experience of which Anna was speaking.

  • Bob Collins

    Some people will say Ronald Reagan was one of the greatest presidents in U.S. history. Without debating that particular assertion, if you believe that, what is it that made him great.

    He was known as “the great communicator.” Was communicating his forte? Was it important? Why?

    Similarly, many people who are now supporting John McCain, voted for — or supported — Mitt Romney. Was it because of his experience or because of his values and vision?

  • Susan W-B

    Qualifications for President (I’m not thinking of any one candidate specifically, just the “ideal” candidate):

    -intelligence

    -the ability to see more than one point of view

    -the good sense to listen to advisors and rivals even when you disagree with them

    -vision and the habit of thinking long-term

    -the ability to inspire, energize, and motivate people

    -common sense

    -good communication skills

    -the ability to work with diverse people

    -a record of fact-based (as opposed to opinion- or ideology-based) decision making

    -pure strength of character and grit

    -level-headedness

    -and of course, a deep and nuanced understanding of the issues that affect our nation and policies that may help to deal with those issues.

  • bsimon

    Regarding qualifications, do you want the literal or the theoretical? The literal are boring (35+, born in the USA). To address the theoretical we have to ask what the job of the President is. My answer is that its largely a role of leadership & decision-making. So. What kinds of ‘experience’ are necessary to demonstrate effective leadership & decision-making? If we’re talking about Pawlenty, we might ask how it reflects on him that he appointed Carol Molnau to be head of MNDOT. It speaks to his frugality, to be sure. What else? Does he value loyalty over competence?

  • c

    I agree with Nikki.

  • GregS

    Pawlenty has been a successful governor. That is good experience for the role of president which is to lead the ADMINISTRATION of government.

    Logically, one picks an administrator to administrate.

    The question is – does Pawlenty have sufficient administrative experience to be presidential material.

    I think not.

    As for comparing Barak Obama favorably with Bush….gosh that is a stretch. Didn’t we just learn a painful lesson in electing an inexperienced ideologue?

    Sure Barak can talk. Gve him a job in the White House — make him press secretary. He might be good at that.

    He sure made a lousy Senator.

  • Chris

    Superior judgment is the sole qualification for president. Everything else is a proxy.

  • c

    //Seems to me he has plenty of credentials to be a leader, and a dynamic and charismatic presence to boot//

    don’t let that dynamic-charismatic booty fool you. Pawlenty is an empty shell. (the man ain’t got no soul) does he listen to his people or fix budgets to make himself look better at the cost of the poor?

  • chris m

    does he listen to his people or fix budgets to make himself look better at the cost of the poor?

    wait- when did Pawlenty fix a budget? aren’t we facing our biggest budget defecit as a state in like 8 years? I seem to remember reading that on the Newscut sometime recently….

    That is good experience for the role of president which is to lead the ADMINISTRATION of government.

    Logically, one picks an administrator to administrate.

    But the president isn’t the administrator of the government. That’s for the senate and congress AND the supreme court to do. The judicial branch metes out justice and supervises the formal taking of oaths. the combined powers of the legislature are the ones who bring into use or operation. They also propose and pass many of their own bills before they make it to the president. I mean, he may be an administrant, but to call him the sole administrator of the country? ridiculous.

    The president, now more then ever, needs to be a “unificatorer, not a divider-upper” to quote one of my favorite Non Sequitor’s.

    Or maybe the leadership skills developed through having actually had leadership experience stood him in good stead when he determined that US goals and interests should not come second to the opinions of countries with different agendas than ours.

    daveg- I think you’ll have a hard time getting a solid half of the country to swallow THIS line, as it relates to Bush’s choices. Pushing our long standing allies to one side without the slightest regard for their input and thoughts on any subject isn’t good leadership, it’s pig headed. And a good way to end up standing alone when we need support the most. Am I saying we should bow to what everyone else wants us to do? Heavans no, but to not even CONSIDER someone else’s opinions? That’s plain stupid. And we’ve all had bosses/ coworkers/ project leaders/ customer service representatives like that at one point or another right? The totalitarians who can’t see that anyone else could possibly have any insight into whatever it is we were tackling at the time?

    And I too shall agree with Nikki’s take on Pawlenty.

  • GregS

    Superior judgment is the sole qualification for president. Everything else is a proxy.

    I suppose that is why it took twenty years to bail out of Rev. Wright’s church.

    I would think, if Mr. Obama has any kind of judgment he would finish his first term in the Senate, but then what does one expect of the impetuousness of youth and inexperience.

  • YOUNG KNIVES

    but then what does one expect of the impetuousness of youth and inexperience.

    -GOOD QUESTION FOR ANNA B

  • chris m

    but then what does one expect of the impetuousness of youth and inexperience.

    quick question- can you really call 47 young? I mean, JFK was only 44 when he was elected…

  • Anna B

    If the question of “impetuousness of youth and inexperience” Young Knives is asking is about Mr. Obama and his choice of church – I will say that you don’t have to agree with everything your pastor says to take part and get something out of your chosen faith community. Much has already been debated about sound bites, things being taken out of full context, etc. Obviously there was something at that church that drew the Obamas – perhaps it was its mission of social justice – but I’m guessing it was more than a few fiery sermons. Or merely youthful impetuousness.

    As for inexperience – see above comments about resume vs. skills. I’d rather have someone with the right skill set than someone chosen for seniority on the job.

  • Bob Collins

    Hmmm. Impetuousness of youth and experience. That’s a good question.

    Is it possible to project, perhaps, what smeone will be like in later years based on what they were at a particular age.

    Let’s take, say, age 44, since that number was just invoked.

    What was McCain doing when he was 44? What was Obama doing when he was 44?

  • GregS

    If the question of “impetuousness of youth and inexperience” Young Knives is asking is about Mr. Obama and his choice of church

    Actually, I was speaking of Mr. Obama’s failure to finish a single senate term before impetuously leaping to the presidency.

    We have several junior managers here who posses excellent verbal and cognitive skills – none of which are applying for job of director.

    Why does this pup think he can spend a third of a term in the Senate then demand to run the whole show?

    The same question goes for his supporters. Hey, why not run Martin Sheen for president? Isn’t he just as gorgeous and doesn’t he have many more years of experience acting presidential?

  • c

    As for inexperience – see above comments about resume vs. skills. I’d rather have someone with the right skill set than someone chosen for seniority on the job.

    that’s a good point. the military gives promotion for time in grade and time in rank, which doesn’t always get the best in command, (like our current president)

  • c

    To answer Greggs question:Why does this pup think he can spend a third of a term in the Senate then demand to run the whole show?

    When your good, your good.

  • GregS

    What are these Obama skills? Reading a speech?

    Good God!! People thought Jimmy Carter had “skills” too. The man was smart, articulate, read a speech well and smiled a lot. He was the proto-type for Barak Obama – but then he was the worst president in U.S. history, including George Jr.

    Campaigning shows what a person can show, experience shows what a candidate can do.

    Mr. Obama has done nothing, absolutely nothing. He is comparitively young for presidential politics, but one would think in the time he had – he could have accomplished just one thing worthy of note.

  • Andy Fisher

    Wow Greg…I get the feeling you aren’t going to vote for Senator Obama. Care to divulge your alternative? Also what have you contibuted that’s “worthy of note” other than a lot of negativity to these comments. Get positive…lighten up…have some hope…believe in new possibilities…do anything thing besides the transparent whining you’re making us all suffer through here.

  • Bob Collins

    Here I go again, asking us to define terms. Greg, when you say “accomplished just one thing worthy of note,” what exactly do you mean?

    I ask because in another thread, someone just posted this about last night:

    I was listening to you, Bob, chat with Mary this afternoon at 4.25 about the line last night. My nephew and I headed over on a bus, suspecting we’d never get in. An older white woman got on after us and didn’t realize she needed exact change, that her $20 wouldn’t generate change, and a Somali man jumped up and paid her fare. As nephew and I wandered around, there were countless other tiny instances of unity.

    Now, I don’t know that after next November — regardless of what happens — a Democrat will get up to pay the fair of a Republican, but is one’s ability to rally a country — even if it means just reading a speech — important or not?

    Theoretically, if length of service vs. the ability to read a speech were the issue, Walter Mondale should’ve and would’ve been a better president than Ronald Reagan. And yet a lot of people want another head on Mt. Rushmore.

    By the way, I don’t think Jimmy Carter was a very good speech-giver, especially if it included the word “malaise.”

    And I would consider Martin Sheen as president but only if John Laroquette were chief counsel. And Ainsley Hayes got a cabinet post of note.

  • GregS

    Here I go again, asking us to define terms. Greg, when you say “accomplished just one thing worthy of note,” what exactly do you mean?

    Fair enough.

    The man is running for president. I would hope that someone who runs for a higher political office would have a few political notches in his belt. Something more than “I got elected” because all “elected” politicians are just that.

    What legislation did Barak Obama shepard through the Senate? What bills bear his name as author, or primary sponsor?

    What Illinois bills bear his name as author or primary sponsor?

    Note: Bills that bear his name in a lengthy list of co-authors do not count. They are just “me too” legislation.

    For instance campaign finance reform is known as “McCain-Feingold” because John McCain and Russel Feingold took the political heat to both work on bi-partisan legislation and to rally their partisans.

    That sort of thing is leadership, not giving speeches before a Hallelujah choir of the converted.

    Oh gee, by the way, why aren’t the Democrats running someone like Russ Feingold for president? He is a guy who actually accomplished something in the Senate.

  • c

    Now, I don’t know that after next November — regardless of what happens — a Democrat will get up to pay the fair of a Republican

    hahahah-that’s very funny and very possible but I highly doubt a Republican would pay the fare of a Democrat-hahahaha

    now

    up your thread @ anna b:

    ‘I’d rather have someone with the right skill set than someone chosen for seniority on the job.’

    In this case, I agree with your point about Obama has the right skills + wisdom and diplomacy.

    How senior does senior have to be to be senior? Obama has some mileage on him.

  • GregS

    It appears the two thing most of the pro-Obama folks point to as the reason to trust our nation in the hands of a guy who didn’t have the patience to finish his first term in the Senate is — the guy is pretty to look at and articulate.

    Gosh, let’s run George Clooney for president.

    The only hope we have as a nation if this guy is elected – is that he matures personally and politically into the job.

    That my friends is called a crap shoot.

    We did it with George Bush and it didn’t work out so good.

    Why do it again, but this time make mistakes from the left?

    Go for it. I will look forward to a Republican sweep in 2010.

  • Brian F

    While I share the concern expressed over Obama’s relative lack of experience (vs. McCain and Clinton), I have to admire his refusal to jump on the gas-tax holiday bandwagon. To me this indicates that he is willing to (a) listen to people who know better (in that instance, every sensible economist) and to (b) take a stance that goes against the political pandering displayed by McCain and Clinton.

    If he is smart enough to surround himself with good advisors, and to listen to them, I’ll be a lot less concerned about his lack of experience as compared to 71-year-old McCain (hey, isn’t the average lifespan of an American male 73 or something?).

    That said… foreign policy, the War, healthcare, the environment — these things are all much more complicated than the gas-tax example…..

  • Andy Fisher

    If he is smart enough to surround himself with good advisors, and to listen to them, I’ll be a lot less concerned about his lack of experience as compared to 71-year-old McCain (hey, isn’t the average lifespan of an American male 73 or something?).

    Unfortunately, the key here is “average lifespan”. McCain has much better healthcare available to him than he’s willing to create for the masses he expects to put him in office…

  • Andy Fisher

    Of course if he chooses the “youthful” Pawlenty as a running mate and does croak during his term, we’ll really see some great belt tightening and continued tax cutting the Republican Party keeps trying to convince us is their platform (what’s that national debt up to now?). The rest of the country could then get a taste of the “fee” based economy Tim’s been so successful with here in Minnesota.

  • GregS

    While I share the concern expressed over Obama’s relative lack of experience (vs. McCain and Clinton), I have to admire his refusal to jump on the gas-tax holiday bandwagon.

    Uh-huh, so what do you call his jumping on the farm-bill bandwagon? If ever there was a guy who lept into bed with the nations most voracious lobbyists, it is Mr. Obama and the farm subsidy interests, like Cargil and ADM.

    Of course then, he has a long, long, long history of association with (liberal) “gimme money” groups.

    McCain voted “no” on the farm bill.

  • GregS

    If he is smart enough to surround himself with good advisors, and to listen to them

    So that is all it takes to be elected president. Gosh, so why don’t we run George Clooney, or even Brad Pit for that matter?

    Or the ever presidential Martin Sheen?

  • GregS

    Imagine Barak Obama walking into the Human Resources offices of General Motors.

    “I would like to apply for a job.”

    “Great”, says the HR executive search recruiter, eyeing an articulate, good looking black man,. “What position are you interested in?”

    “CEO”, Barak says.

    “Uh-huh”, he says silently pushing the alarm button for security.

    “Maybe I am not familiar with your work. What qualifies you for the role of CEO?”

    “I wrote a book about hope. I’ve been on TV a lot. I personally know Oprah – and she can help me find advisors”

    “Really?”

    “And I promise to listen to them too.”

    “I am sure you are special, but why don’t you apply for something more in-line with your talents – like something in corporate communications?”

    “No. It’s CEO or nothing. I represent a lot of union members and customers upset at the direction of the company. We want change.”

    “Oh — you mean the very people whose stubborn insistence on rigid work rules, expensive healthcare, generous pensions and behemoth SUV’s got us into this mess.”

    “That’s right. We changed our minds, now we want small electric cars.”

    “Mr?”

    “Obama”

    “Right, Mr. Obama, obviously you are not qualified for CEO, but since you represent upset union members and customers – do us a favor. Ask them what we are supposed to do once you lead them down the wrong path and they change their minds again?”

  • c

    gregs

    i can’t ever see obama stepping a foot into general motors to be ceo.

    thats like george bush wearing a pink tutu

  • c

    what concerns me most is Pawlenty having a shot at President. i can only imagine that his financial supporters would really be the ones running the country. as i said the man is an empty shell

  • brian

    “What was McCain doing when he was 44? What was Obama doing when he was 44?”

    As long as I’m doing my math right…

    McCain was getting divorced and re-married when he was 44. He wasn’t elected to congress for the first time until he was 46.

    Obama had just been elected to the senate.

    That said, I’m not sure that means anything. McCain wasn’t exactly just twiddling his thumbs all that time.

    I think it is a crap shoot whenever we elect a president. Democracy doesn’t work by electing the most qualified for the job. We all have to hope that whomever is elected selects the qualified people as advisors.

  • GregS

    Democracy doesn’t work by electing the most qualified for the job.

    Wow!!!

    Now, THERE is a true Obama believer

  • Andy Fisher

    Looks like you’ve pretty much got this thread all to yourself now GregS. Does the “S” stand for Stubborn, Self-righteous, Single minded and Says the same thing over and over. My guess is that you’re either a Republican, racist, distraught Hillary supporter or a combination of the aforementioned.

    The President of this nation is a figure head (unless he or she suspends the rules of law as our current one did) and, as such, needs the following qualities:

    – Consensus builder and uniter

    – Vision articulator (as in new vision)

    – Compromiser (as in responding to critics rather than ignoring them – like you)

    – Communicator

    – Agenda setter

    – Innovator

    It seems to me that Barack Obama possesses a good share of these and that’s why people see him as a leader. He has worked hard to overcome much in a land that has a hard time living up to its moniker of a place where “all men are created equal.” He seems to has served his working class and legislative constituents in a humble and honorable manner.

    Is he supposed to wait until he has more experience to offer his services to a country in desperate need of change? If my kids drowning at the beach, am I going to wait until I get my Water Safety instructor license to jump in and save them?

    Seems to me I’ve seen plenty of CEOs with polished resumes and years of the “right” experience drag their companies into insolvency while taking home an undeserved share of the wealth their employees generated for them. Seems to me we’ve had one in the White House for the last 8 years.

    Good luck with your decision this fall GregS. Hopefully you’ll find another perfect, qualified human being like yourself to vote for.

    God Bless,

    Andy

  • brian

    “Democracy doesn’t work by electing the most qualified for the job.”

    I’m not saying that is how it should work, I’m saying that is how it does work. Plenty of past presidents, both good and bad, were not the most qualified for the job. I’d be willing to suggest that EVERY president wasn’t the MOST qualified person for the job… although I don’t know enough to fully back that up (I’m talking most qualified off all americans, not just the people running).

  • brian

    “McCain was getting divorced and re-married when he was 44. He wasn’t elected to congress for the first time until he was 46.”

    Looking back at my comment:

    I realized I probably phrased it that way for partisan reasons. I should have said:

    McCain was still in the Navy when he was 44.

  • GregS

    If my kids drowning at the beach, am I going to wait until I get my Water Safety instructor license to jump in and save them?

    Yeah, that’s what I would want when my kid is drowning. An young, inexperienced kid with no credentials elbowing aside all the proven, certified staff to show off for a gaggle of fawning groupies.

  • Momkat

    GregS–you are not a happy person! Also, it’s B A R A C K not B A R A K

    spellingly yours,

  • chris m

    GregS-

    I’m pretty sure if it was YOUR kid, and YOU jumped in the water, you wouldn’t think of YOURSELF as someone who was showing off for a gaggle of groupies

    although, clearly, since you are well versed in all things political, you might want to rush in and try to clinch a candidacy for yourself. Then you can show all of us impetuous youths the what-for.

    Is it impetuous of Obama to run for the presidency? I don’t think so. Just like it’s not necessarily impetuous for someone who has been with a company for a short time to seek a promotion. If they have the skill sets, if they have (as Obama seems to) the support of people around them in pursuing this opportunity, how is that him being impetuous?

    While you are CLEARLY unhappy with Obama’s selection, I still have not seen you put up one single shred of evidence that says he is a failed senator. Is not rushing to propose hasty legislation a failure? Again, and I’ve said this before, being the president is less about making your own legislation, and more about making sure the bills you sign off on are the right ones for your country.

    And don’t make this an arguement about the young not being able to teach the old anything. All you have to do it take one quick look at the complexity of the VCR to know that’s not the case….

  • chris m

    you know though, on the plus side, if Pawlenty WAS the VP, we could see about getting an effective governor voted in…

  • GregS

    Is it impetuous of Obama to run for the presidency? I don’t think so. Just like it’s not necessarily impetuous for someone who has been with a company for a short time to seek a promotion. If they have the skill sets, if they have (as Obama seems to) the support of people around them in pursuing this opportunity, how is that him being impetuous?

    Seeking a promotion to president after barely finising a third of a first term in the Senate is the very definition of impetuous.

    As for his “skill set”. Any drug addled rock-star can excite a room-full of liberal arts college kids.

    Maybe he should go into entertainment.

  • Momkat

    Hey, thanks, GregS–i haven’t been called a “liberal arts college kid” for 46 years.

    And Chris M, if Pawlenty were to become VP, wouldn’t we have to survive Gov. Molnau for a while?

  • GregS

    While you are CLEARLY unhappy with Obama’s selection, I still have not seen you put up one single shred of evidence that says he is a failed senator. Is not rushing to propose hasty legislation a failure? Again, and I’ve said this before, being the president is less about making your own legislation, and more about making sure the bills you sign off on are the right ones for your country.

    Chris,

    When promoting a candidate for president, it is customary to advance their accomplishments, not ask others to prove that their do-nothing candidate was an abysmal failure.

    Barack Obama has not done enough to even be considered a failure – he is more of a “what were you thinking” sort of candidate.

    By the way, presidents do not legislate. They administrate.

    Although they may champion legislations, their primary role is that of an adminstrator. That is why they call that branch of government The Administrative Branch.

    Hope this clears up the confusion.

  • chris m

    …Let’s start at the beginning here. The president CAN propose legislation. It has to pass the senate and congress, but there are bills that originate in the presidents hands. Sure, his primary goal is that of administrant, but he touches legislation. It, unfortunately, takes all three branches of government to be the administrators of this government. All you have to do is open a dictionary. (but you’d better go to administrate. Since the entries for administrator typically say “one who administrates)

    And I haven’t said word one about Obama being my candidate. I asked what your basis is for beliving he is a failure.

    Since you have yet to provide one, beyond he hasn’t finished his first term, I just have to assume you don’t have a valid one. You are another die-hard, pulpit beating complainer who can do nothing to back up his statements besides repeat them over and over and over again until people just ignore him.

    Ah well. Better to be an easily inspired, liberal arts college kid, then an illiterate forum-troll.

  • GregS

    Chris,

    First of all, the only mention I made of the word “failure” was to reference Obama’s failure to finish his first term. You construed that to mean I feel Obama is a failure. I don’t. He does not have enough experience to be considered either success or failure.

    It, unfortunately, takes all three branches of government to be the administrators of this government

    Obviously your head was nodding during eigth grade civics class. Passing budget and regulatory legislation is not “administration”

    According to Webster Administer is defined as

    1: to manage or supervise the execution, use, or conduct of

    2 a: to mete out : dispense b: to give ritually c: to give remedially

    intransitive verb

    1: to perform the office of administrator

    2: to furnish a benefit : minister

    3: to manage affairs

    None of which are done by the Congress and Senate.

    Sadly, the courts overstep themselves into Administration from time to time.

  • C

    /Those are not normally the credentials you would associate that would next lead you to be the leader of the free world.” ///

    ARENT THOSE PAWLENTY’S WORDS? AND SO WHAT CREDENTIALS DOES PAWLENTY HAVE TO LEAD A FREE WORLD.

    FREE WORLD AND PAWLENTY JUST DO NOT GO TOGETHER. THE MAN IS BOUND BY MONEY. HE IS FAR FROM ANYTHING THAT IS FREE

  • GregS

    c,

    Democrats, liberals and prgressives are more driven by vested, monied interests than Republicans. It is just that the money that drives the left comes from different, more wealthy sources.

    Keep in mind that the largest, wealthiest, most powerful lobbying group in the state is Education Minnesota.

    Also keep in mind the wealthiest family in the state, are the Polhad, whose wealth is only 1/25th the size of the pension funds owned by state civil service unions.

    Now that….is REAL power.

  • c

    how do the wealthy get wealthy and stay wealthy….uh by tax breaks made by ummmmm Pawlenty

  • c

    /Keep in mind that the largest, wealthiest, most powerful lobbying group in the state is Education Minnesota.

    Also keep in mind the wealthiest family in the state, are the Polhad, whose wealth is only 1/25th the size of the pension funds owned by state civil service unions./

    wha?

  • GregS

    how do the wealthy get wealthy and stay wealthy….uh by tax breaks made by ummmmm Pawlenty

    Huh?

    What “tax breaks” has Pawlenty made?

    If I am not mistaken, your DFL buddies gave the Polhad’s a gift of a stadium.

    Real nice of them to do that.

  • Bob Collins

    //If I am not mistaken, your DFL buddies gave the Polhad’s a gift of a stadium.

    I only jump in here for clarification sake. The stadium vote was not Democrat vs Republican.

    It was Hennepin County vs. non-Hennepin County.

    In the Senate vote the DFL split was 22-16. The GOP vote was 12-16.

    In the House the DFL split was 34-31. The GOP vote was 37-31.

    And the governor signed the bill. In fact, if he had wanted to give his veto pen the workout he bragged about in the last session, he would have had clear sailing. There wasn’t anything CLOSE to the an veto-proof vote.

  • GregS

    It was no Pawlenty’s finest moment.

    Not the house GOP’s either.

    I didn’t know that many GOP’ers failed their constituents.

    Thanks for the input Bob.

  • Bob Collins

    Their feeling seemed to be — it seems — “we’re not failing OUR constituents because Hennepin County taxpayers (not MINE) are the ones who pay.

    The other excuse is they’d say “WE didn’t vote to raise taxes in Hennepin County, we voted to ALLOW Hennepin County to raise taxes.”

  • GregS

    Uh-huh, I suppose that works for everybody but the Republican representatives from Hennepin County. Don’t know if any from there voted yes, but if so, they got some explaining to do.

    The DFL from Hennepin County?

    Giving away tax money is their forte.

    Personally, I have no problem with a government run self-funded stadium like the Metro-dome.

    There is a tradition of such things going way back. I don’t think the coliseum in Rome or the Hippodrome in Constantinople were privately funded but I doubt that one family made so much money on the deal — well, maybe not, recalling the history of Rome and Byzantium, that probably was the case.

  • c