On the other hand…

Every now and again a news story comes along so filled with irony that you can spend half a day turning it around and around trying to make it black or white. Last year, for example, my favorite was the bill at the Capitol (eventually signed) was the one that mandates that American flags sold in Minnesota can only be made in the United States.

Today, it’s this one:


The Tennessee parents of a U.S. soldier killed in Iraq are attempting to open a $40 billion class-action lawsuit against Flagstaff T-shirt vendor Dan Frazier.

Frazier sells shirts emblazoned with the phrase “Bush Lied, They Died,” along with the names of thousands of soldiers killed in Iraq.

Is it freedom of speech? And, if so, isn’t that what soldiers are defending? On the other hand — and these sorts of stories tend to be full of “on the other hands” — should you profit on the deaths of others?

(H/T Politics in Minnesota)

  • c

    how does one fit ‘thousands ‘ of names ledgible enough to read on a t-shirt?

    the names do not need to be on the t-shirt to make the slogan still meaningful. but that is just my opinion

  • bsimon

    “should you profit on the deaths of others?”

    Why is this question posed of T-shirt vendors, but not of the manufacturers of munitions and war materiel?

  • GregS

    Freedom of speech includes the freedom to be a thoughtless jackass.

    Sadly there are those who believe everything that can be said, must be said.

  • Mac Wilson

    “Why is this question posed of T-shirt vendors, but not of the manufacturers of munitions and war materiel?”

    Thread over.

  • GregS

    Because the manufacture of munitions and war material serve to PROTECT rather than KILL our service men and women.

    These things also PROTECT the lives of civilians in places like Iraq and Afghanistan against the terrorist who kill indiscriminatly.

    But we all know where you are coming from.

    The “peace” movement has always worked to cripple our nations military in order to render the munitions and war material of our opponents more effective.

  • Jamie

    “Because the manufacture of munitions and war material [sic] serve to PROTECT rather than KILL our service men and women.”

    Are you suggesting that the T-shirts are killing our service men and women?

    It doesn’t appear to me that the “peace movement” in general is working to cripple our military. I’m sure there are a few who would totally dismantle the military if they could. But it looks to me like there’s generally just a desire for using our military only for the legitimate defense of our country and its real interests (not what has been happening lately).

    I think many of the parents of slain military men and women are so offended by things like the T-shirt because one of the few things that mitigates their pain is a belief that their children died for a cause. But the T-shirt maker has every right to sell the T-shirts. Some would say he even has the responsibility to speak out against the tyranny of this administration.

    Do we know what he is doing with the money he’s making? I’m sure it’s not very much. If we question the T-shirt guy, we could question anyone who draws a salary from doing work for a cause — that’s a whole lot of people, including me for most of my life.

  • c

    /”Bush Lied, They Died,” /

    i have been wearig a bush LIES button for years. adding the “they died” I believe does not mean just US Military but also the lives of the innocent citizens of Iraq.

    this does not mean that i do not love my country. i do love america. but i believe we need to think of peace globally and start thinking WE instead of US

  • http://ima kate

    well said C. I don’t really understand the grounds for a law-suit here. Aren’t the names of the soldiers killed in the line of duty released to the public? Instead of trying to profit from their child’s death, maybe they could just ask that company to leave their son’s name off of future t-shirts.